Segmentation

(redirected from segmentations)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.
Related to segmentations: Segmented Markets

segmentation

[‚seg·mən′tā·shən]
(communications)
The division of a long communications message into smaller messages that can be transmitted intermittently.
(computer science)
The division of virtual storage into identifiable functional regions, each having enough addresses so that programs or data stored in them will not assign the same addresses more than once.
The division of a large computer program into smaller units, called segments.
(zoology)

Segmentation

 

in linguistics, the linear division of speech or a text into segments that correlate with specific language units. Segments may be meaningful, as in the case of sentences, words, and morphemes (syntactic and morphological segmentation), or not meaningful, as in the case of syllabemes and phonemes (phonetic segmentation). “Dual linguistic segmentation,” a term introduced by A. Martinet, is also used in this regard. Segmentation is a syntagmatic procedure that precedes definition of paradigmatic units, which are established by comparison of segments. Linguists oppose segmental units to the suprasegmental units of language.


Segmentation

 

(1) In morphology, the division of the body of some animals or of individual organs into a linear series of segments, or metameres. (2) In embryology, a series of consecutive divisions of an egg.

segmentation

(networking)
(Or "segmentation and reassembly", SAR) Breaking an arbitrary size packet into smaller pieces at the transmitter. This may be necessary because of restrictions in the communications channel or to reduce latency. The pieces are joined back together in the right order at the receiver ("reassembly"). Segmentation may be performed by a router when routing a packet to a network with a smaller maximum packet size.

The term "segmentation" is used in ATM, in TCP/IP, it is called "fragmentation" an is performed at the IP layer before the "fragments" are passed to the transport layer.

See for example ATM forum UNI 4.0 specification.

References in periodicals archive ?
A series of representative algorithms from different categories in the image segmentation field are considered in order not to restrain the potential application domain.
A histogram based segmentation algorithm is generally considered to over-segment the input image.
Optimized implementations of the region growing segmentation algorithms are the seeded region growing described in [20] and the adaptive region growing described in [21].
The segmentation is obtained by partitioning the graph into connected components so that the edges between the nodes in the same component have higher weights (the higher the weight, the lower the dissimilarity).
The Vincent-Soille algorithm is the classic approach when it comes to watershed based segmentation.
Because each of the segmentation algorithms used had its "strengths and weaknesses", a method of selecting the better results was needed.
Considering all aforementioned assumptions, a performance evaluation parameter was introduced for each considered segmentation algorithm - called the over-segmentation factor.
Based on the dynamic analysis of the output results of the independent segmentation algorithms used, an over-segmentation factor is associated with each as follows: a low one (user defined) for the algorithm that produces the fewest clusters, a high one (also user defined) for the algorithm that produces the most clusters and a variable one to the other algorithms (computed using linear interpolation based on the number of clusters they produce).
On the other hand, it can be observed that the mean shift and graph segmentation methods tend to under-segment the image.
The framework is efficient because it runs all configured input segmentation algorithms in parallel.