Seguidilla


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Seguidilla

 

(1) A stanza in Spanish poetry that has been known since the 13th century. The simple seguidilla is a four-line stanza whose first and third lines have seven syllables; the second and fourth lines have five syllables and are rhyming. The addition of three further lines of five, seven, and five syllables, respectively, with the two five-syllable lines making a new rhyme, results in the complex seguidilla.

(2) A paired Spanish folk dance, originating in Castile in the 15th or 16th century. It has a lively tempo and is in 3/4 time. The dance is accompanied by the singing of simple or complex seguidilla stanzas with a mainly lyric content and by guitar and castanets. The seguidilla has regional variations, of which the most important are those of Murcia and Seville, the latter known as the sevillana. The seguidilla has been utilized in concert music; examples are Glinka’s overture Night in Madrid and de Falla’s cycle of songs Seven Spanish Folk Songs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Canciones Arabescas, Felipe Pedrell ("Cancion Callejera," "Seguidillas Gitanas," "Boleras Estudiantiles," "Copla Marinera," "El Columpio," "Copla de Baile")
Evocative melodies are sewn throughout the opera, including The Habanera, The Seguidilla, The Flower Song and The Toreador's Song.
Macdonald takes a different view, finding Bizet's piece not only better than David's, but also sowing the seeds of ideas later to reappear in Carmen: the Bolero "La marguerite a ferme sa corolle" (foreshadowing the theme of Carmen's act 2 "Chanson boheme"), and the ascending tra-la-las that end the number--a trick reused at the end of the so-called "Seguidilla." In this respect he also identifies a model for the "Toreador Song" in the bull-tamer Orrias's couplets "Si les filles d'Arles sont reines" from Gounod's Mireille.
It features some of the most evocative and best-loved melodies in opera; The Habanera, The Seguidilla, The Flower Song, The Chanson Boheme and perhaps the best-known baritone aria of all The Toreador's Song.
In the spring of 1972, knowing just two arias (one of them the "Seguidilla" from Carmen), she auditioned for both the Canadian Opera Chorus and the University of Toronto Opera School, winning admission to both.