seizing


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seizing

[′sēz·iŋ]
(engineering)
Abrasive damage to a metal surface caused when the surface is rubbed by another metal surface.
(metallurgy)
Welding a workpiece to a die member under the combined forces of pressure and sliding friction.

seizing

The damaging of one metal surface as a result of rubbing with another metal surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2004), another case where a defaulter sued the government to keep it from seizing her federal payments, the Eighth Circuit Appellate Court ruled that if Congress had wanted Social Security payments to be seized it would have originally written that into the amended HEA in 1991.
In seizing the Iraqi funds, the Bush administration ignored the advice of 20 former national security officials, "including a former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff'," recalls Moore.
Because drug subjects often present a flight risk, investigators should consider seizing property at the time of arrest or during the execution of search warrants.
"The seizing of this vehicle should serve as a notice to those apartment owners who would seek to subvert New York's tenant protection laws," he said in a statement.
As a category specific to philosophy, truth is what I call an operator for seizing truths.
Seizing illegal cigarettes and alcohol is also a priority and police have been working with HM Customs to target sales of these items.
Upon lawfully seizing a pager incident to arrest, an officer initially must realize that the retrieval of alphanumeric or voice messages within a pager is not an interception of a communication, as defined in the federal electronic surveillance statute commonly referred to as Title III.(1) This statute applies to both federal and state officers and requires judicial approval in the form of an extraordinary court order for the nonconsensual interception of wire, oral, and electronic communications.(2) Many states have enacted similar electronic surveillance statutes, which must be at least as restrictive as the federal statute.(3)
At issue in Good is whether the government must meet due-process guarantees under the Fifth Amendment when seizing property.