selenography

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selenography

(sel-ĕ-nog -ră-fee) The study of the Moon's physical features. See Moon, surface features.

Selenography

 

the branch of astronomy concerned with the description of the surface of the moon. As new methods of studying the moon develop, the term “selenography” is being supplanted by the terms “selenodesy” and “selenology.”

selenography

[‚sel·ə·näg·rə·fē]
(astronomy)
Studies pertaining to the physical geography of the moon; specifically, referring to positions on the moon measured in latitude from the moon's equator and in longitude from a reference meridian.
References in periodicals archive ?
LRO PDS Archive Interface) Dale and UT Equivalent Selenographic Coordinates Oct 30 UT 01:50-02:05 49.5[degrees]W, 24.4[degrees]N Oct 30 UT 01:50-02:05 49.0[degrees]W, 25.3[degrees]N Oct 30UT 01:55-02:05 47.8[degrees]W, 23.1[degrees]N "--" 47.9[degrees]W, 23.3[degrees]N "--" 48.0[degrees]W, 23.5[degrees]N Nov 28 UT 00:45-01:45 47.8[degrees]W, 23.1[degrees]N Nov 28 UT 00:30-01:45 48.0[degrees]W, 23.2[degrees]N Nov 28 UT 00:45-01:45 47.6[degrees]W, 23.0[degrees]N Nov 28 UT 01:09-01:15 49.3[degrees]W, 25.3[degrees]N
A similar observation but with the sun's selenographic latitude in the southern hemisphere would be highly informative in this regard.'
Mean colongitude 227[degrees].4, selenographic latitude +0[degrees].77.
Located at selenographic latitude 49 [degrees] south and longitude 6 [degrees] east, Heraclitus is best viewed during the Moon's first-quarter or last-quarter phase.
The Plato 'hook', as it is often described, (2) is not readily observed, since its appearance is critically dependent upon a particular combination of selenographic colongitude, libration and topography.
A more precise way to locate the terminator's position is by the Sun's selenographic colongitude, the Sun's position in its monthly circuit around the lunar sky.
The Sun also moves in lunar, or selenographic, latitude, sometimes standing a little north of the Moon's equator and sometimes south.
The laser altimeter on the Clementine lunar orbiter could not map areas north of selenographic latitude 70 [degrees], so graze timings are still needed for this purpose.