selenosis


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Related to selenosis: selenium, selenium poisoning

selenosis

[‚sel·ə′nō·səs]
(medicine)
Selenium poisoning.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Grewal (2015) stated that hair Selenium is better indicator of chronic selenosis as compared to plasma Selenium concentration as hair selenium is 16 times and plasma selenium 10 times higher in selenotic animals.
But it is also known that Se interpolates into disulfide bridges of protein, causing a structural weakness that leads to selenosis [25].
Despite the necessity for selenium, the range of intake between selenium deficiency (<40 [micro]g.[d.sup.-1]) and selenium toxicity (selenosis) (>400 [micro]g.[d.sup.-1]) is very narrow in humans (WHO, 1996).
Excessive selenium levels, although rare, can result in selenosis, which may cause upset stomach, hair loss, fatigue, irritability, and mild nerve damage.
Pathology of experimentally induced chronic selenosis (alkali disease) in yearling cattle.
Excessively high levels of selenium in the body can result in a condition called selenosis, a condition that causes intestinal upset, hair loss, garlic breath, fatigue, irritability, and bone abnormalities.
High blood levels of selenium can result in a condition called selenosis (42).
Consuming more than 400 mcg per day could cause selenosis, a toxic reaction marked by hair loss and nail sloughing.
Selenium (Se) toxicity, also referred as selenosis, is a serious threat when excess of Selenium is found in soils.
In this study population, we did evaluate the sentinel signs and symptoms of selenosis (Lemire M, Philibert A, Pillion M, Passos CJS, Guimaraes JRD, Barbosa F Jr, Mergler D, unpublished data), and we observed no association between any of the biomarkers of selenium (Se) status and signs and symptoms of selenosis (hair loss, broken nail walls, nail sloughing, skin lesions, garlic breath, gastrointestinal disorders, and motor and sensory deficits), despite high Se body burdens.
In contrast, an analysis of Se in human milk collected in the region in China where human selenosis is endemic (Enshi area) showed a level of 283 ng Se/mL milk (44).