self-identity

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self-identity

the self-concept; the self as reflexively understood, as a continuing project – See also SELF.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was the first study that examined youth with psychiatric disorder by comparing what type of service they were receiving and whether that was associated with self-concept," said Mark Ferro, Assistant Professor at the University of Waterloo.
Self-concept might be an important aspect to consider when implementing treatment programs to improve the mental health of youth who are hospitalized.
According to the study, self-concept among the inpatient group, as measured on the Self-Perception Profile for Children and Adolescents, was "significantly compromised.
Self-concept is a hierarchical, multidimensional construct that has been habitually used interchangeably with terms such as self-efficacy, self-esteem, self-worth, and self-identity (Bong & Skaalvik, 2003).
2003) analyzed the relationships between self-concept and various personality factors in a sample of 174 Spanish adolescents.
Many studies have been conducted on exhibiting strong relationships between a number of motivational indicators and academic self-concept of students which seems to be systematically related to ratings of teachers about students' involvement level and diligence in activities of classrooms (Skaalvik and Rankin, 1996; Skinner, Wellborn and Connell, 1990), students' ratings of endeavour (Skaalvik and Rankin, 1996), help-mongering behaviors of students (Ames, 1983), and intrinsic motivation measures (Gottfried,1990; Harter and Connell, 1984; Mac Iver, Stipek, and Daniels, 1991; Meece, Blumenfeld, and Hoyle, 1988; Skaalvik and Rankin, 1996).
Keywords : Mood- States, Adolescents, Family- Pathology, Academic-Achievement, Self-Concept, Birth-Order, Working Status of Mother, and Educational Status of Mother.
schizophrenia, Cotard syndrome) affecting personal identity and the mastery of I come from a dysfunction of the phenomenal sense of self I posit to explain how we can come to acquire a self-concept.
During early adolescence, self-concept is unstable but later on with growing age self-perceptions develop into more detailed, structured and precise form (Pastorino and Doyle-Portillo, 2013).
Self-concept in general, as defined by Shavelson, Hubner, and Stanton (1976), is a person's perception of himself.