self-energy


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self-energy

[¦self ′en·ər·jē]
(physics)
Classically, the contribution to the energy of a particle that arises from the interaction between different parts of the particle.
In a quantized field theory, the contribution to the energy of a particle due to virtual emission and absorption of other particles, in particular, mesons and photons.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here, [G.sup.(0)] is the free single-particle propagator, [summation] is the fermion self-energy, I is the BS kernel, and the two-particle free propagator [K.sup.(0)] = GG is a product of two fully dressed single-particle Green's functions.
Commenting specifically on the electron's self-energy intra-action, the physicist Richard Feynman expressed horror at the electron's monstrous nature and its perverse ways of engaging with the world: 'Instead of going directly from one point to another, the electron goes along for a while and suddenly emits a [virtual] photon [which is the carrier of the electromagnetic field]; then (horrors!) it absorbs its own photon.
In this work, we consider a uniformly charged finite rectangular domain (which would represent either a uniformly charged nanoplate or a finite rectangular jellium background for a 2DEG) and calculate exactly the amount of Coulomb electrostatic self-energy stored in that system.
In fact, due to the presence of the magnetic contribution, the long range transverse interactions in deconfined degenerate quark matter give rise to the NFL behavior manifested in the appearance of anomalous contribution to the low temperature limit of the quark self-energy. The breakdown of the Fermi liquid (FL) picture has drawn substantial theoretical interest primarily due to the detection of the NFL behavior in normal state of superconductors [10-13] and in the systems of strongly correlated electrons [14-16].
In the classical Lorentz theory of electron, the self-energy is closely connected to the electromagnetic mass of the electron.
Incoherent transport can be described by introducing appropriate self-energy terms which can be derived systematically from many-body perturbation theory [13].
Thus, for Lorentz invariant self-energy, the wave function renormalization constant can equivalently be expressed as
where [G.sup.a] is the advanced Green's function and [[SIGMA].sup.L] and [[SIGMA].sup.R] are the self-energy matrices of the left and right electrodes, respectively, which are obtained using the surface Green's function technique:
The quasiparticles energies were converged with respect to the energy cut-offs, the number of k-points in the Brillouin Zone (BZ), and the number of bands used to compute the dielectric function and the self-energy. The plasmon-pole model was used to describe the dynamic dependence of the screening function [20].
The latter part contains self-interaction and eventually leads to the infinities of self-energy that can be removed by re-normalization procedures.
While of course it is important to perform all the job duties and tasks as effectively as possible from a medical standpoint, on a larger scale over time, it is important to become a positive role model, to be a contagious positive presence, infecting people around you with your positive self-energy in order to change things for the better one slow step at a time.