enhancement

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enhancement

[en′hans·mənt]
(computer science)
A substantial increase in the capabilities of hardware or software.
(electronics)
An increase in the density of charged carriers in a particular region of a semiconductor.

enhancement

(1)
A change to a product which is intended to make it better in some way, e.g. new functions, faster, or occasionally more compatible with other systems. Enhancements to hardware components, especially integrated circuits often mean they are smaller and less demanding of resources. Sadly, this is almost never true of software enhancements.

enhancement

(2)
Marketroid-speak for a bug fix. This abuse of language is a popular and time-tested way to turn incompetence into increased revenue. A hacker being ironic would instead call the fix a feature, or perhaps save some effort by declaring "That's not a bug, that's a feature!".

enhancement

Any improvement made to a software package or hardware device. Sometimes enhancements are really bug fixes in disguise.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another intervention that used self-esteem enhancement was by Shiina and colleagues (2005) in a group of bulimic patients.
The change in selfesteem was used to determine the effectiveness of the self-esteem enhancement program.
Self-Esteem Enhancement. Mentors received a guidebook of self-esteem enhancement activities to use with the students they were mentoring.
While each service-learning approach presented opportunities of expanding student experience, the differences in self-esteem enhancement hinged on student age, the feature of the program, and the community support.
Indeed, black students enrolled in Afrocentric educational programs receive a full-course diet in self-esteem enhancement, all of it positioned on the shaky theoretical ground that injecting racial pride into black children will help them overcome obstacles to academic success.
He suggests, instead, that agencies and professionals working in HIV prevention with gay men focus on preaching monogamy, avoidance of anal sex, disclosure of HIV serostattis to partners, and self-esteem enhancement. This premature conclusion about the ineffectiveness of safer sex is perhaps his greatest error in logic made in the book.