self-identity


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Related to self-identity: self-concept

self-identity

the self-concept; the self as reflexively understood, as a continuing project – See also SELF.
References in periodicals archive ?
Raven Girl is strange, compelling, and disturbing; it is, perhaps, meant to disturb, with its questions raised, implicitly or explicitly, about chimeras, genetic tinkering, and self-identity. There are obvious parallels with transgender individuals who feel like they were "meant to be" something else.
These results suggest that motivations and factors such as self-identity and involvement with a vegetarian or vegan group can make it more likely that people will stay vegetarian or vegan.
Michaelidou and Hassan (2008) have merged self-identity and perceived ethical obligation into a single construct addressing people's inclination to perceive themselves as "ethical consumers," termed ethical self-identity.
Integration processes of European cultural images will speed up searchings of Lithuanian self-identity. European identity is seen as the attribution of the European political community or the presence of European cultural feeling.
Ferguson is concerned with giving a panoramic view of the messiness of both self-identity and everyday life in the modern world.
While instrumental possessions clearly serve the effectance motive and, possibly, the "place to call one's own" motive or "place to live motive," symbolic possessions would serve the self-identity motive.
Results also show that 86% feel that young black girls will be inspired to embrace their own sense of self-identity as a result of Malia and Sasha Obama's role in the first family.
Interdependence implies that self-identity is based upon maintaining harmonious relationships and is traditionally associated more with women.
Giddens reminds us of "the emergence of new mechanisms of self-identity which are shaped by--yet also shape--the institutions of modernity" (p.
The professionally trained black female artists of chapter three, "The Nineteenth-Century Professional Vanguard," are the first about whom Farrington could address the issue of self-identity essential to the title of her book, but, strangely, she does not.
Sparks, P., & Shepherd, R., (1992) "Self-identity and the theory of planned behavior: Assessing the role of identification with green consumerism," Social Psychology Quarterly, (55: 4), pp.