self-poisoning


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self-poisoning

[‚self ′pȯiz·ən·iŋ]
(chemistry)
Inhibition of a chemical reaction by a product of the reaction. Also known as autopoisoning.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These facts point to the possibility that some of the deaths classified as accidental were not, in fact, accidental, resulting in under-reporting and under-estimating the magnitude of mortality due to intentional self-poisoning with drugs.
Studying the Relationship Between Age, Gender and Other Demographic Factors with the Type of Agent Used for Self-Poisoning at a Poisoning Referral Center in North West Iran/Kuzey Bati Iran'da Bir Zehirlenme Referans Merkezinde Kendini Zehirlemek icin Kullanilan Ajan Tipi ile Yas, Cinsiyet ve Diger Demografik Faktorlerin Iliskisinin Arastirilmasi.
Cases of self-poisoning with ACE (n = 8), THX (n = 6), and CLO (n = 5) were few in comparison (Phua et al.
9,12,13 Pesticide self-poisoning is responsible for about one-third of world's suicides.
It's an inbuilt mechanism to protect from self-poisoning, explains Lucy, who says her own daughter Molly, who's nearly two, has just changed from loving all fruit to refusing to eat any of it.
Self-harm, according to Newton's study, refers to nonfatal self-poisoning, such as alcohol or drug abuse, or self-injury, such as cutting, regardless of whether the intent was deliberate suicide.
Furthermore, a review of poisoning studies reveals that pesticides are the commonest means of self-poisoning in many rural areas and associated with a high mortality rate [45].
DSH, defined as intentional self-poisoning or self-injury, is a closely related public health problem.
13,14,17,19,20,26, 28,29,31,33-35,37,38,42,43] The second most frequently reported method was self-poisoning (often ingestions of organophosphate pesticides), which accounted for 16 to 49% of all suicides.
In adolescence there is a second peak, due to deliberate self-poisoning.
The act of self-poisoning, in particular, was represented in official reports as mediated by a type of ignorance that belonged to the consumer, and not simply a consequence of their unabated circulation within the social body (House of Commons, 1839; Pharmaceutical Journal, 1865).