self-reference

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self-reference

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Finally, Tonio encourages the audience to consider that all actors are human beings who have feelings, which is the last self-referential element of the prologue.
The new collection by Craig Foltz, We Used to Be Everywhere, traces the boundary between fiction and prose poetry, using a somewhat Language-centered writing that is self-referential in places, identifying a slippery, indeterminate discourse.
In the few instances Ride to Hell begins to approach something of even tangential relevance, poorly written, self-referential humor kills the mood.
What is lacking in either the Psalms or the Syriac memre and yet central to the Qur'an is the self-referential metadiscourse of revelation and scripturality.
"When the church does not emerge from itself to evangelize, it becomes self-referential and therefore becomes sick," Bergoglio said, in a translation according provided by the Associated Press.
Like a conventional dictionary it has alphabetically organized entries, but each entry contains numerous references to other entries and reads more like a self-referential encyclopedia.
Godel's proof emerged from deep insights into the self-referential nature of mathematical statements.
These principles lead to the conclusion that education is a necessity of life and a social function, and that it is self-referential and cross-referential by others, and is conditioned by conservatism or progressiveness subject to measurable criteria, whilst its democratic perception is assessed by the quality of the respective societies.
a pivotal moment in Wes Craven's self-referential and self-reverential slasher, a character professes: "The first rule of remakes: don''t mess with the original."
AT A pivotal moment in Wes Craven's self-referential and self-reverential slasher, a main character professes: "The first rule of remakes: don't mess with the original."
In 2007 he published "I am a Strange Loop," which describes the human mind as a self-referential system that may defy mathematical description.
He's strong, too, on memorable details (there have been fewer than a dozen earthquake-related deaths in Britain over the past five centuries, and one of those was a suicide) and offers a wealth of observations both social--never judge a town by its railway station: these, 'in a strangely self-referential way; are always on the wrong side of the tracks--and meteorological: the higher you go, the clearer it becomes that the weather has been the most important factor in shaping our landscape.