semidiurnal


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Related to semidiurnal: ebbed

semidiurnal

[¦sem·i·dī′ərn·əl]
(astronomy)
Having a period of, occurring in, or related to approximately half a day.
(meteorology)
Pertaining to a meteorological event that occurs twice a day.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional enhancements in the CESM ocean component, meant to improve the representation of tidally driven mixing, include separate treatment of diurnal and semidiurnal tidal constituents and implementation of a subgrid-scale bathymetry parameterization that better resolves the vertical distribution of the barotropic energy flux, following Schmittner and Egbert (2014); alternative tidal dissipation energy datasets from Egbert and Ray (2003) and Green and Nycander (2013); and introduction of the 18.
Crabs were exposed to a diel light-dark cycle and a semidiurnal tidal cycle at the collection site.
The astronomical tide on the Cantabrian coast has a semidiurnal character and moves from W to E, with a lag of several minutes and increasing in height several centimetres.
Tidal forcing of enterococci at marine recreational beaches at fortnightly and semidiurnal frequencies.
Moreover, the semidiurnal tides in Karachi help spreading of outfall effluent away from the coast with strong dispersion and dilution process including rapid FC-coliform die off rate [9, 29].
When using the solar time the best fit is a function with a diurnal periodicity (see Figure 1(b)) whereas when using the sidereal time the best fit has a semidiurnal periodicity (See Figure 1(f)).
The average salinity of the seawater in the tidal flat is 16 psu and the tide type is informal semidiurnal with an average tidal range of 4.
2005) analysed 51 rain gauges with records spanning between 22 and 28 years in the tropical Andes of Colombia and found diurnal (24h) and semidiurnal (12h) cycles with precipitation maxima occurring in the afternoon or around midnight, or both.
Bian: Solar Semidiurnal Tide in the Troposphere: Detection by Radar Profiles, Bull.
Granted that Earth's huge tidal grip has held the lunar rotation 'captive' in spin-orbit synchrony from the earliest times however the lunar orbit may have changed, (3) with the result that there has never been any long-sustained semidiurnal (lunar sense) ebb-&-rise of tides on the Moon, that is, any progressive motion in longitude of the lunar tidal bulge.