semimonocoque

semimonocoque

[¦sem·i′män·ə‚käk]
(aerospace engineering)
A fuselage structure in which longitudinal members (stringers) as well as rings or frames which run circumferentially around the fuselage reinforce the skin and help carry the stress. Also known as stiffened-shell fuselage.

semimonocoque

semimonocoque
Semi-monocoque fuselage construction.
A type of aircraft structure in which the skin also shares part of the load.
References in periodicals archive ?
The basic airframe has evolved over the years, but the concept of a semimonocoque rear fuselage mated to a metal-skinned steel-tube cabin, a long and slender tapered wing and distinctive reverse tail has endured.
Most of the modern aircraft structures are designed using a semimonocoque concept.
In semimonocoque construction techniques, stringers are supported by wing ribs and fuselage frames.
It would use the latest in aviation technology, including such innovations as retractable landing gear, a low-wing monoplane design with a semimonocoque fuselage, twin engines instead of three engines, and variable-pitch propellers.