semiquaver

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semiquaver

Music a note having the time value of one-sixteenth of a semibreve
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This, when combined with the echoing room (its wooden dance floor no absorber of errors), created such a messy cacophony that, when I hit the semiquavers, the entire performance derailed.
Sharp noted James Higgins's 'Radstock Tune' in 2/4 time, with two sets of four semiquavers (or the equivalent) to the bar.
Yes, dear Madame, Lucette will be walking through life with an escort of four flats and twelve semiquavers into the bargain.
The third poem, Fish, is directly inspired by an Iranian motif, which develops into fast flowing, breathless semiquavers.
This systematic recurrence is joined to an art of arrangement which would offer, through its psychological, poetic, and philosophical insights, an exceptional interest even for those to whom quavers and semiquavers are meaningless hieroglyphics.
The rasp of double-stopped notes, the spiraling frenzy of semiquavers warned him [her husband] away.
Believing this sense of the ridiculous to be a prophylactic that protects us from mistaking mere human earnestness for authentic spiritual seriousness, he exults in seeing Klee "scribbling, / where once there was crucifixion, / those crotchets and semiquavers / with which levity begins.
Four semiquavers would be '1-e-and-a' (A) and 'one a penny' (C), and multiple beats of semiquavers in a row described as 'one a penny, two a penny' (C).
Grieg's single grand opus has become everyone's idea of a piano concerto, with its dramatic opening, cascades of semiquavers, and a nice big tune in the slow movement.
Birdland, the great hit by Weather Report, comes up fresh and new and What a Wonderful World is typical of Alan's treatment of a slow ballad, with the flurries of perfectly timed semiquavers revealing how much he owes to the great Lionel Hampton.
The baby, however, practically disappears from the narrative until the very end, after the wagtail has fled in terror at the sight of the adult human (represented musically by accented right-hand octaves in semiquavers and their semitonal 'shadows' in the left hand).
Even the earlier edition has a much more advanced setting than some of those in the late eighteenth century, but note how the accompaniment metamorphoses from a comparatively bare bassline-sometimes resulting in open octaves or fifths, and with only a few dyads or triads-to a full pianistic setting with full chords involving the right hand as much as the left; and oscillating quavers and semiquavers for additional texture.