semitone

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semitone

an interval corresponding to a frequency difference of 100 cents as measured in the system of equal temperament, and denoting the pitch difference between certain adjacent degrees of the diatonic scale (diatonic semitone) or between one note and its sharpened or flattened equivalent (chromatic semitone); minor second

Semitone

 

the smallest interval in European music. In the modern system of temperament, all semitones are equal, and there are 12 semitones in an octave.

There are three types of semitones: diatonic, chromatic, and enharmonic. The diatonic semitone is an interval between adjacent steps of a scale (for example, B to C, D to E flat [a minor second]). The chromatic semitone is the interval between a foundation and its raised or lowered variant (for example, F to F sharp, an augmented prime). The enharmonic semitone is the interval formed by the alteration of adjacent steps—for example, F double sharp to A flat, a double-diminished third (seeINTERVAL).

semitone

[′sem·i‚tōn]
(acoustics)
The interval between two sounds whose frequencies have a ratio approximately equal to the twelfth root of 2. Also known as half step.
References in periodicals archive ?
With regard to the shape of the background scheme itself, Maneri not only de-emphasizes the semitonal intervals, but also takes advantage of the sheer variety of possible "step" sizes available-for example, in the background progression of a twelfth-tone, a twelfth-diminished major third, a third-tone, a sixth-tone, a quarter-augmented minor second and a twelfth-augmented minor second beginning on the twelfth-high B on line three (notes 9-15 of Example 7b).
The baby, however, practically disappears from the narrative until the very end, after the wagtail has fled in terror at the sight of the adult human (represented musically by accented right-hand octaves in semiquavers and their semitonal 'shadows' in the left hand).
Similarly, Xenakis's 1990 algorithm assumes a single unit of elementary displacement, and his 1990 string quartet, Tetora, remains strictly within semitonal space.
Yavorsky's use of the Russian lad (generally translated as "mode") emphasizes intervallic relationships but does not fix a single tonic pitch; rather the modes are derived from the arrangement of all six tritones and their semitonal resolutions.
Godsalve suggests that the main themes for each group of characters can be derived from an Urmotiv comprising a falling three-note figure, E-D-C, sometimes compressed by semitonal steps, or, in the case of the lovers, modified by the intrusion of an additional note which Godsalve likens to the Renaissance cambiata.
James gives us the musical cosmology of a seminal source, the Timaeus of Plato, almost word for word from Francis Cornford's confusing, outmoded, and unmusical interpretation (Plato's Cosmology, The Timaeus of Plato [New York: Humanities Press, 1952]); his introduction of the monochord is much too cursory and muddled for the uninitiated, mixing up the relationship of part to part and part to whole without explanation; Kepler's "Venus ratio" of 24:25, which is the semitonal difference between a major and a minor third, he calls "barely equivalent to the Pythagorean comma", too small by a factor of three.
Her loss seems understated in the cry, "they shaved us," repeatedly reinforced with the archetypally pathetic figure of a semitonal neighbor-note.
The manuscript shows clearly that the left-hand D is sharp, not natural - an important semitonal inflection in the three preceding bars.