scend

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scend

[send]
(engineering)
The upward motion of the bow and stern of a vessel associated with pitching.
The lifting of the entire vessel by waves or swell. Also known as send.
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Delivery rules can be very effective against viruses and other threats that rely on sending vast numbers of the same email message.
Anybody who generates nothing in sales after sending thousands of messages will be forced to find some other nefarious means of support.
Currently, only the sending device can control, but JetSend is being developed to allow control from either end.
Thomas Ryan Nault, 39, entered his plea after prosecutors decided not to retry him on two felony counts of sending computer messages with the intent to seduce a minor.
After repeatedly sending commands Tuesday and today, ``we'll wait until Friday, when we (will) have the opportunity to listen,'' Hardin said, ``to see if it does respond and does send a signal back.
Now, making payments is as easy as sending a text message anytime, from anywhere for the millions of customers that prefer to use PayPal.
Post offices throughout the San Fernando Valley were packed Sunday with customers sending off last-minute packages to loved ones.
The imageCLASS MF7280 performs printing and copying of letter-sized output at 20 pages-per-minute with full duplexing capabilities for copying, printing, sending and faxing.
They can cause power blackouts, block some radio communications and trigger phantom commands capable of sending satellites spinning out of their proper orbits.
B2B organizations sending on the weekends may have been rewarded for their unconventional choice of day to send, as their average click-through rates were 25 percent higher on the weekend," said Stewart.
Parents with no other choice, who must send their children to the nearest public school, must do so knowing, for the most part, they are sending their children to schools that are significantly less well-funded, less well-maintained, and less-effective institutions of learning than they were a generation ago.

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