senility


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senility

(sənil`ətē), deterioration of body and mind associated with old age. Indications of old age vary in the time of their appearance. Stooped posture, wrinkled skin, decrease in muscle strength, changes in the lens and muscles of the eye, brittleness of bone and stiffness of the joints, and hardening of the arteries (arteriosclerosisarteriosclerosis
, general term for a condition characterized by thickening, hardening, and loss of elasticity of the walls of the blood vessels. These changes are frequently accompanied by accumulations inside the vessel walls of lipids, e.g.
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) are among the physical changes associated with old age. The mental changes associated with senility include impairment of judgment, loss of memory, and sometimes childish behavior. The psychological changes are thought to be related to aging of the cortical brain cells. Whereas the physical changes associated with aging occur in all individuals to some extent, evidence of psychological degeneration is not universal. In common usage, the term senility is applied only to mental deterioration. See geriatricsgeriatrics
, the branch of medicine concerned with conditions and diseases of the aged. Many disabilities in old age are caused by or related to the deterioration of the circulatory system (see arteriosclerosis), e.g.
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; Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease
, degenerative disease of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex that leads to atrophy of the brain and senile dementia and, ultimately, death. The disease is characterized by abnormal accumulation of plaques and by neurofibrillary tangles (malformed nerve
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; amnesiaamnesia
, [Gr.,=forgetfulness], condition characterized by loss of memory for long or short intervals of time. It may be caused by injury, shock, senility, severe illness, or mental disease.
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senility

[si′nil·əd·ē]
(geology)
The stage of the cycle of erosion in which erosion of a land surface has reached a minimum, most of the hills have disappeared, and base level has been approached.
(medicine)
Old age and its characteristics.
References in periodicals archive ?
In simple words it implies that senility is the end-result of childhood as dusk is that of dawn.
Alas, just when we are battling senility, forces are gathering to take advantage of our depleted abilities.
According to Katherine Houpt, VMD, PhD, the emeritus James Law Professor of Animal Behavior and director of the Behavior Clinic at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine, the most dramatic and most frequently reported behavioral indication of feline senility is an elderly cat's persistent vocalization during the night.
The percentage reporting senility, dementia, or another cognitive deficit rose with age: 1% of those aged 65-74, 6% of those 75-84, and 18% of those 85 or older.
Organized thematically, works range from ancient depictions of amputation-related disability to Salvador Dali's surrealistic painting conveying senility. Artists portray specific conditions, the practice of medicine, doctors as either miracle-workers or quacks, and illness as metaphor.
The play explores the themes of senility, loneliness and treachery.
What of others, who through ageing conditions other than senility, no longer have any quality of life, should we close their final weeks?
And, he discusses how genetic "mismatches" cause the deadly diseases that afflict humanity today: diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and senility, among others.
If probable cause for inquiry is established but the judge disputes the finding, then a panel of judges on a different court would appoint a physician to perform a confidential examination solely for the purpose of determining senility or lack thereof.
A bespectacled Stewart makes Vladimir studious and seemingly intellectual, while his friend of 50 years has the fussiness of old age but also the memory lapses that suggest a fall into senility.
Caine is especially moving in his portrayal of senility, while Milner, last seen in Skellig and Son Of Rambow, is a smashing little actor.
There is indeed a deep poignancy in the fate of a remarkably long list of our chief figures from the very beginning: Phillip embittered and exhausted; Bligh disgraced; Macquarie despised here and discredited at home; Macarthur mad; Wentworth rejecting the meaning of his own achievements; Parkes bankrupt; Deakin outliving his superb faculties in a long twilight of senility; Fisher forgotten.