sense light

sense light

[′sens ‚līt]
(computer science)
A light which can be turned on or off, its status being the determinant as to which path a program will select.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those cells need molecules called retinal to sense light and trigger a cascade of signalling to the brain.
They embedded multiple contact sensors, so the gripper could sense light and deep touches.
Examining how these seemingly simple creatures, which are far more complex than many people imagine, communicate, how some sense light without eyes, and how some are virtually immortal.
Other than a primitive back bone-type structure, lancelet has no clearly defined face, no bones or jaws, and its small brain has only a single "frontal-eye" that can sense light. Because of how little it has changed in the last hundreds of millions of years, the species has often been called a "living fossil."
It should be capable to sense light as well as heavy loads, to have less hysteresis losses, precise control of lever, less operating effort.
Embedded photo cells in a catom would also enable it to sense light, so that a human replica can 'see.
The base shield offers sixteen Grove sockets to add modules that sense light, temperature, gas, and dust, a digital or analog accelerometer, plus I/O functions such as a joystick or an OLED display.
Photonic sensors are devices that have the capability to sense light and release electrical pulses.
He and his colleague Alexander Dizhoor wondered if, instead of tickling the cells with electricity, scientists could transform them to sense light and do what rods and cones no longer could.
This tag recorded a precipitous temperature drop (peak [DELTA]T = -0.98[degrees]C [min.sup.-1]) to 5.53[degrees]C,but the tag did not sense light or air and did not transmit until 11 d post mortem (Table 1; Fig.
Valeria Canto-Soler, Ph.D., said that the 3D complement of human retinal tissue, not only has the architectural organization of the retina but also has the ability to sense light, and the work advances opportunities for vision-saving research and may ultimately lead to technologies that restore vision in people with retinal diseases.
As day breaks and your eyes sense light, your brain starts to wake up and you start feeling alert and energized.