sensible

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sensible

1. having the capacity for sensation; sensitive
2. a less common term for leading note
References in periodicals archive ?
Choose quirky accessories to personalise your room and counteract the 'sensibleness' of the grey.
Yet this is not the main point: the most important aim of the model is to verify the sensibleness of estimated values with respect to the available experimental data and assess the conceptual consistency of the theoretical model with the current knowledge of the universe.
As Gilbert Ryle noted more than four decades ago in one of the first modern philosophical readings of the novel, Sense and Sensibility "really is about the relations between Sense and Sensibility, or, as we might put it, between Head and Heart, Thought and Feeling, Judgement and Emotion, or Sensibleness and Sensitiveness." (12) Ryle stopped short, however, as have most commentators on this novel, of seeing that Austen is interested in the relationship between rival approaches to understanding experience because she sees that the way a person tries to attain knowledge is inseparable from his or her own ethical makeup.
He has already pledged me to Him by his betrothal-ring, and has adorned me with immense jewels." (3) Fabius did not understand her veiled admission of being Christian, just as Fabiola could not explain Agnes's extreme unselfishness, purity, simplicity, sensibleness, and wisdom.
Thus, I reiterate my call to sensibleness in order to safeguard our 700,000 industrial jobs and achieve tens of pending projects, notably in the interior regions, that could not be launched for lack of required serenity."
Congress hasn't grasped the sensibleness of a National Institute of Nutrition and a separate approval system for nutritional- and natural compound-based therapy.
(43.) See 567 F.3d at 816 (recognizing sensibleness of limiting actionable retaliation to those who opposed or participated in activity).