sensitive switch

sensitive switch

[′sen·səd·iv ′swich]
(electricity)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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However, a toothbrush only weighs about 15 grams, so you will need a very sensitive switch.
In a statement yesterday his parents, Stanley and Hilary, revealed how their son began to emerge from his "sleep" about three years ago and has continued to improve in his ability to communicate using the touch- sensitive switch .
* Install the sensitive switch (WP 0031 00-6 in -34-2).
Setting a switch up at waist level or using lights with a touch sensitive switch should be considered.
A bank of touch sensitive switches controls sits across the central control panel and the cabin is decked out with ambient lighting at night and can be characterised even further with a fragrance diffuser which dispenses three different aromas to suit your mood.
Quantum Tunneling Composite materials have a varying resistance according to the amount of pressure applied, and can thus be used to create pressure sensitive switches and controls that have no moving parts (and therefore a long operating life) and which can sense no only pressure, but also variations in the amount of pressure.
You can activate the laser, the light or both with one hand, using the pressure sensitive switches. It's ambidextrous and with the built-in textured surfaces and neatly designed ergonomic grip, it's not only comfortable, but rugged and easy to grasp.
It offers sip/puff switches, sensitive switches, foot switches, multiple switches, switch interfaces, general switches, mounting devices, and training and game software.
Power pads, sensitive switches, expanded keyboards, voice synthesizers and Braille printers are shown in use by students of all ages (17 months to college) with such learning challenges as visual impairments, attention deficits and cerebral palsy.
PHOTO : Burton Pusch uses lighting systems that incorporate touch sensitive switches.
Believe it or not, simple movements--like a nod, swipe or blow--can activate sensitive switches, making it possible for almost anyone in need to find a suitable switch.