sensory control

sensory control

[′sen·sə·rē kən′trōl]
(control systems)
Control of a robot's actions on the basis of its sensor readings.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, if you make a lesion in the spinal cord, they can fully regenerate it and gain back both motor and sensory control," says Karen Echeverri, associate scientist in the Eugene Bell Center for Regenerative Biology and Tissue Engineering in Woods Hole, Mass.
10:30 - SENSORY CONTROL OF WHIP SPIDER SPATIAL BEHAVIOR.
This allows for significant simplification the transfer from the inevitable and expensive building of low-level sensory control systems to the development of the top-level of control systems (CS).
Maintaining balance during upright standing is a complex task, requiring a combination of sensory control, motor control, and biomechanical constrain.
It may be done with open or closed eyes (the sensory control is reduced, only if the subject can maintain position with closed eyes).
Considering bishops' establishments, Woolgar argues an atmosphere of holiness was achieved through sensory control and conspicuous nonconsumption of luxuries, which distract the household from its spiritual duties.
"The fact that they were able to provide this degree of use [with the artificial arm] and the potential for sensory control is really quite wonderful," comments Gregory A.
"The fact that they were able to provide this degree of use [with the prosthesis] and the potential for sensory control is really quite wonderful," comments Gregory A.
It may be that the crab has more similarities to the stick insect model than to the lobster model in terms of its reliance on sensory control, and an orthogonal command set based on the equilibrium interneuro ns may be sufficient to control a large part of its locomotion.
Here one might mention the sensory control of maze learning and the study of terns.
This allows for significant simplification the transfer from the inevitable and expensive building of low- level sensory control systems to the development of the top-level of control systems (CS).
People with spinal medullary lesions show a deficit of voluntary motor control and sensory control limiting the performance of the daily tasks and the overall effort.