separatist

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separatist

, separationist
a. a person who advocates or practises secession from an organization or group
b. (as modifier): a separatist movement
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The state courts had based their rulings on separationist language in their state constitutions, but the Supreme Court asked the states to reexamine those decisions in light of Trinity Lutheran.
Brennan, who was on the Court from 1956 to 1990, was the most ardent separationist in the modern history of the Court.
Common taboo topics include Tibetan and Uighur separationist movements, political reform and democracy, labor protests, individual human rights activists, and so forth.
Citing no source or authority other than Reynolds, Justice Black, writing for the majority, invoked the Danbury letter's "wall of separation" passage in support of his strict separationist interpretation of the First Amendment prohibition on laws "respecting an establishment of religion."
1, 15-16 (1947) (describing strict separationist characterizations of Establishment Clause).
In that case, Justice David Souter, writing for the majority, found that historical evidence 'supports no solid argument for changing course" from Everson's separationist dictate.
The awakening of the independentist and separationist trends in southern Yemen heralds tense and bloody times.
Aa Perhaps this New York "summit" will be the last gasp of the fruitless pursuit of a separationist solution for those who live, and will continue to live, in the "Holy Land".
When blacks received citizenship after the Civil War, white Americans created separationist strategies to argue (ahistorically) that real whites had never associated socially with blacks.
I believe that the separationist demand that government do nothing to "aid religion" is fundamentally disconnected from and at odds with this reality of extensive religion in existing social-service programs and practices.
But Backus also made comments that imply separationist inclinations; in his words, "the confounding of civil and ecclesiastical affairs together has done amazing mischief in this world." (6) In "An Appeal to the Public for Religious Liberty," Backus stated, "Now who can hear Christ declare that his kingdom is NOT OF THIS WORLD, and yet believe that this blending of church and state together can be pleasing to him?" (7) Backus's words (and ire) were often directed at the practice of state taxation for the support of establishment ministers; et he consistently identifies the "confounding of church and state" and not mere establishment as the principal evil.
Ultimately, separationist language led to the third of the Supreme Court's three-pronged requirement (the so-called Lemon test).