septum

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septum

1. Biology anatomy a dividing partition between two tissues or cavities
2. a dividing partition or membrane between two cavities in a mechanical device

septum

[′sep·təm]
(biology)
A partition or dividing wall between two cavities.
(electromagnetism)
A metal plate placed across a waveguide and attached to the walls by highly conducting joints; the plate usually has one or more windows, or irises, designed to give inductive, capacitive, or resistive characteristics.

septum

1. A low wall or balustrade which divided the nave of the ancient basilican church into a middle section (for the clergy) and two side sections (for the laity).
2. A low wall around a tomb.
3. The enclosure of the Holy Table made by the altar rails in a church.
References in periodicals archive ?
Electrocardiographic, echocardiographic, and angiographic findings were consistent with septal myocardial infarction, but not definitive enough to make a diagnosis of isolated septal myocardial infarction.
An adequate exposure of the VSD is crucial to avoid complications such as residual ventricular septal defect, TR and complete heart block.
The present study was conducted to determine the role of septal nuclei in modulating sexual behavior in male albino rats.
The study population comprised of patients with nasal septal deviation and the control group comprised of 52 volunteers who had no rhinologic complaints and no pathological findings on anterior rhinoscopic and endoscopic nasal examination.
Among all patients, the prevalence was 67% for NVC, 76% for septal deviation, and 72% for inferior turbinate hypertrophy The prevalence in the subgroup of patients with severe/extreme nasal obstruction for NVC, septal deviation, and inferior turbinate hypertrophy was 73,80, and 77%, respectively.
PTSMA has been given a Class IIa recommendation for adult patients with an unacceptable surgical risk (Level of Evidence: B) in an experienced center.[9] However, data on the effectiveness of these two septal reduction therapies in China are lacking.
Lutembacher Syndrome (LS) is a rare cardiac clinical entity comprising of an unusual combination of atrial septal defect (ASD) and acquired Mitral valve stenosis (usually of the rheumatic nature).1 LS is an infrequent disorder with a prevalence of 0.001 million per population, mostly occurring in females.2,3 The clinical presentation and prognosis of the disease varies depending on a multitude of factors; the most important one being the size of the defect while other factors include severity of stenosis and compliance of the right ventricle.
Six patients who were found to have atrial septal defect were transferred to the department of cardiology of our hospital to undergo atrial septal defect occlusion and drug treatment, and none recurred during follow up.
Mohammad Kashif Shaikh said that most children with uncomplicated Atrial Septal Defects (ASD) are followed up by their primary care provider and receive follow-up with a pediatric cardiologist every year or every other year.
"Crochetage" (notch) on R wave in inferior limb leads: a new independent electrocardiographic sign of atrial septal defect.
Nasal septal surgery is one of the most frequently performed operations in otorhinolaryngology clinics (1, 2).