bipartite uterus

(redirected from septate uterus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to septate uterus: Bicornuate uterus

bipartite uterus

[bī′pär‚tīt ′yüd·ə·rəs]
(anatomy)
A uterus divided into two parts almost to the base.
References in periodicals archive ?
The septate uterus: a review of management and reproductive outcome.
Complete septate uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and ipsilateral renal anomaly: pregnancy course complicated by a rare urogenital anomaly.
The flat fundus with an internal indentation depth of 16.7 mm and an indentation angle of 75[degrees] was consistent with a partial septate uterus (Figure 2) (according to the Congenital Uterine Malformations by Expert (CUME) criteria and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) classification system of female tract congenital anomalies).
Within this system, six groups are elucidated: segmental Mullerian hypoplasia or agenesis (Group I), unicornuate uterus (Group II), uterine didelphys (Group III), bicornuate uterus (Group IV), septate uterus (Group V), arcuate uterus (Group VI), and diethylstilbestrol related anomalies (Group VII) [2].
The intraoperative findings confirmed the diagnosis of complete septate uterus with double cervix and double vagina, which was completely consistent with the preoperative evaluation.
Septate uterus was found in only 4 cases by 4D ultrasonography against 46 free cases.
Septate uterus is the most common uterine abnormality associated with RPL and is associated with a good reproductive outcome.
Megan Daw's Master Class entitled "Managing the Septate Uterus" (May 2012, p.
On MR imaging, a fundal indentation deeper than 1 cm and a muscular and fibrous septum separating the divergent uterine horns greatly favors a bicornuate over septate uterus. When the septum extends all the way down to the cervix, causing its duplication, it is called bicollis, while it is a unicollis when septum does not reach the external os.
Septate uterus, which results in a 60% spontaneous abortion rate, is probably the second leading cause of first-trimester losses.