septicaemia

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septicaemia

(US), septicemia
a condition caused by pus-forming microorganisms in the blood
References in periodicals archive ?
Mortality rates were highest among patients with septicemic (89%) and pneumonic (93%) forms of infection (Table 2).
Septicemic, pharyngeal and bubonic plague are transmitted by the bite of infected fleas.
Carrier hosts would exhibit a propensity to harbor the organism in a sequestered location within their bodies (7,78,79), and later become septicemic in response to some stressor; their fleas, imbibing the organism under septic conditions, would initiate a new epizootic.
This article demonstrates how rheumatoid arthritis can be confused with septicemic arthritis.
Prolonged elevation of interleukin-8 and interleukin-6 concentrations in plasma and of leukocyte interleukin-8 m-RNA levels during septicemic and localized Pseudomonas pseudomallei infection.
Specific Treatment: Untreated bubonic plague has a case fatality rate of nearly 50% while untreated primary septicemic and pneumonic plague are invariably fatal.
A case in point is that of the late, beloved puppeteer Jim Henson, whose septicemic infection had become so severe by the time he got to the hospital that he died within hours of admission, despite lengthy heroic treatment efforts.
Mechanisms of meningeal invasion by septicemic extra cellular pathogens: the examples of Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus agalactiae and Escherichia coli (Join-Lambert, Carbonnelle, Chretien, Bourdoulous, Bonacorsi, Poyart and Nassif)
Salmonella typhimurium was isolated from multiple organs in all examined sparrows; they were diagnosed with septicemic salmonellosis.
To the Editor: Yersinia pestis (family Enterobacteriaceae) is a bacterium that can cause high rates of death in susceptible mammals and can provoke septicemic, pneumonic, and bubonic plague in humans (1).
Prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria in septicemic neonates in a tertiary care hospital.
pestis in humans occurs in one of three primary clinical forms: bubonic plague is characterized by regional lymphadenopathy resulting from cutaneous or mucous membrane exposure, primary septicemic plague is an overwhelming plague bacteremia usually following cutaneous exposure, and primary pneumonic plague follows the inhalation of aerosolized droplets containing Y.