sequela

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sequela

[si′kwel·ə]
(medicine)
The abnormal aftereffects or complications of an illness, infection, or injury.
References in periodicals archive ?
Egger said that several factors need to be considered when studying these sequelae, particularly the child's baseline behaviors and the impact parental worry may have on children after a serious illness or injury.
Sixty (30 male and 30 female) patients with tuberculosis sequelae between 50-65 years of age were selected from the inpatient department of the Government Hospital of Chest Diseases in Puducherry-6.
In this context, the present study was conducted to assess the prevalence of traumatic injuries in children aged 0-6 years and the resulting sequelae in the primary dentition.
Hearing sequelae. There is enormous variability in the literature regarding the incidence of hearing sequelae, ranging from 4% (25) to 30% incidence (33, 34).
Tuberculosis sequelae: pathophysiological aspect (ventilation).
These include hemorrhagic (160-162), cerebral infarction (163), unspecified (164), occlusion and stenosis (165-166), other cerebrovascular deaths (167-168), and deaths with cerebrovascular sequelae (169).
From a functional standpoint, it seems likely that sequelae from generation of ROSs could require time as well as sufficient concentration in an agglomerate to reach the threshold to alter the ultrastructural morphology.
The potential for neurobehavioral sequelae is an issue that has not been adequately factored into the risk-benefit decision for treating women with epilepsy or bipolar disorder during pregnancy.
The horrific events of 9/11 and its sequelae have reinforced what thoughtful analysts have long known: that they have a responsibility to respond to the complex social and educational issues arising in their communities--to function, that is, as "community psychoanalysts." Analysts in the Trenches illustrates what socially engaged analysts can offer to violent and disturbed communities.
The use of oral contraception was not associated with a significantly elevated or reduced risk of PID sequelae. According to the authors, "This analysis of the PID Evaluation and Clinical Health cohort lends strength to the literature on condom use and the prevention of PID and its sequelae" (p.