sequential machine

sequential machine

[si′kwen·chəl mə′shēn]
(computer science)
A mathematical model of a certain type of sequential circuit, which has inputs and outputs that can each take on any value from a finite set and are of interest only at certain instants of time, and in which the output depends on previous inputs as well as the concurrent input.
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We next describe a sequential machine that can be in one of a finite number of states, receive one of a finite number of inputs, and emit one of a finite number of outputs.
The reason that the two formulations are the same in actuality is quite simple: it is always possible to simulate a parallel machine with a sequential machine.
If we accept the sequential computation thesis, which states that time on all "reasonable" sequential machine models is related by a polynomial [11], then the no-tape RAM is an unreasonably strong model of computation, at least when it comes to sublinear algorithms.
My intent here is that a reasonable algorithm be used on the sequential machine.
Rule 4: The parallel and sequential machines must not be "crippled.
I see this grand goal of making parallel programming an attractive option for sequential machines as important for the following reasons:
It unifies third-party software for sequential machines with parallel machines, enabling parallel computing to compete to become a platform for software commodity products.
Today, supercomputers are becoming standard fare in systems design, problem solving, neural networks and scores of defense applications where their blinding speed can offer solutions to complex problems in just 30 minutes, compared to 24 hours or longer with traditional sequential machines.
Spectral Methods Of Synthesis Of Sequential Machines.
He then works through an analysis of synchronous sequential machines including sequential circuits and methods of analysis, the synthesis of synchronous sequential machines, including Moore and Mealy machines, analysis of asynchronous sequential machines, synthesis of asynchronous sequential machines, and pulse-mode asynchronous sequential machines.
The audience for high-performance computing is not the computer science community, but scientists, engineers, and other technical programmers whose computational requirements exceed the capacities of even our fastest sequential machines.
Since computers are either individual sequential machines or collections of sequential machines, it seems unrealistic to attempt to eliminate procedurality entirely.

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