sequestration

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sequestration

the forcible removal of goods and possessions, and, as used by FOUCAULT (1975), the enforced deprivation of personal liberty by the state in modern societies within specialized forms of CARCERAL ORGANIZATION.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sequestration

 

in bourgeois civil law, a prohibition or limitation imposed by the state in the state’s interest on the use of some property, for example, explosives, narcotics, or poisons.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
To underscore carbon sequestration variations not fully accounted in wood industry documents, "Determining the Carbon Footprint of Wood" offers as an example the harvesting of a Southeast forest at 25-year intervals, which eliminates "the opportunity for [each] tree to sequester an additional 380 lbs.
A Greek Cypriot who is owed over Au2m sterling by the Turkish Cypriot Immovable Property Commission (IPC) sequestered, through the courts in the north, the vehicles owned by 'government ministers' as part payment, his lawyer said.
"I don't like the sequester," House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) told reporters as he asked President Obama for ideas on how to replace it with different cuts.
In contrast, pyrolysis with biochar carbon sequestration produces renewable energy, sequesters CO2 and cycles nutrients back into agricultural fields," said Steiner.
The city's urban forest currently stores an estimated 8.8 million tons of carbon and sequesters nearly 68.785 lbs.
This exchange sequesters 1.9 Gt C/a in terrestrial hiomass, an amount that is almost counterbalanced by emission of 1.7 Gt C/a from deforestation, thus yielding a small positive sequestration gain of 0.2 Gt C/a.