seraph

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seraph

(sĕr`əf), plural

seraphim

(–ĭm), supernatural being. The name seems to derive from the Hebrew word "to burn." According to the Book of Isaiah, seraphim have six wings. Scholars have suggested that seraphim were winged serpents. In Numbers, the word "seraph" denotes a "fiery" (i.e. poisonous) serpent. Like cherubim, seraphim are associated with the glory of God, as in the liturgy. See also cherubcherub
, plural cherubim, kind of angel. Cherubim were probably thought of in the ancient Middle East as composite creatures like the winged creatures of Assyria. In Jewish tradition, they are described (Ezek.
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Seraph

A celestial being or angel of the highest degree, usually represented with six wings.

Seraph

 

in Judaic and Christian mythology, one of the higher orders of angels.

seraph

1. Theol a member of the highest order of angels in the celestial hierarchies, often depicted as the winged head of a child
2. Old Testament one of the fiery six-winged beings attendant upon Jehovah in Isaiah's vision (Isaiah 6)
References in periodicals archive ?
A sort of "trinitarian dance" (chore) characterizes the triune God in whom we are integrated, so that we never quit this movement in which the Son, in his body, wanted to place us and transform us: "The faithful does not transform Christ into himself (non in se transformet Christum)," states the Seraphic Doctor in a masterly way from his eucharistic perspective, "but instead is as if projected (traiiciatur) into his mystical body." (14)
How do well-intended social justice warriors assume their seraphic purity and unfallenness--when they tear down monuments honoring those who served nobly, albeit in defense of impure causes?
18 Seraphic Fire presents David Lang: The Little Match Girl Passion at Vanderbilt Presbyterian Church.
I can never remember ever sitting throughout a concert with a seraphic smile on my face.
In "Animalia Anima," three seraphic children carry out symbolic gestures on spinning sofas.
The tracks are "Bring the Flavors" (3:03), "Time In" (3:22), "Wave Theory" (2:46), "Waterfalls" (4:25), "Seraphic Journey" (8:16), "Enigmatic Land" (3:00), "Cloud Forest" (4:31), "Marketplace" (3:04), "The Magician" (4:05), "Dawn Walker" (2:35), "Beach Traffic" (2:06), "Choco Latte" (5:39), "Electric Sonata" (4:13), and "Liquid Entropy" (3:30).
Then the title page: "The Encyclopaedia Britannica A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and General Information." Then eight pages identifying contributors by their initials, from A.B.R.--Alfred Barton Rendle, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S., keeper of the Department of Botany at the British Museum, who wrote about "Fruit"--to W.S.P.--Walter Sutherland Parker, deputy chairman of the Fur Section of the London Chamber of Commerce, who wrote about "Fur." Finally, the articles, from "Franciscans," which begins with a parenthesis--"(otherwise called Friars Minor, or Minorites; also the Seraphic Order; and in England Grey Friars, from the colour of the habit, which, however, is now brown rather than grey)"--to "Harmonium," which ends with a footnote, citing the "Allg.
In short, for the Seraphic Doctor, because nothingness always resides in creation, creation itself is fundamentally vain.
(7.) The phrase "rational creature" is found extensively in Catherine's Dialogue and proves especially valuable in this context for emphasizing dependence, a consequence of "creatureliness." See for instance, "Open the eye of your intellect, and gaze into Me, and you shall see the beauty of My rational creature," and "everything has been created for the service of man, to serve the necessities of rational creatures, and the rational creature has not been made for them, but for Me, in order to serve Me with all his heart, and with all his affection." Catherine of Siena, The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin Catherine of Siena, trans.
Lewis saw this new type of realism as meant to displace the older realism of a William Dean Howells, which was much politer in tone and searching for a path midway between the extremes of the most enchanted "seraphic romanticism" (as in Poe) and the most disenchanted "brutal naturalism" (as in Zola, Norris, Dreiser or Herbert Spencer) (cf.
She tiptoes between the bodies toward the front door, careful not to disturb their contrite, slightly-smirched seraphic reposes, driven to the first full presence of light and warmth, the beach, where pulverized particles from the ageless earth cling to skin that can be licitly exposed but only to a point that's recalibrated with every successful transgression.