serial learning

serial learning

[′sir·ē·əl ′lərn·iŋ]
(psychology)
The type of association in verbal learning involved in learning the alphabet; studied in the laboratory by giving the subject serial lists to learn, where each list would consist of a number of unrelated items.
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In the present research 3x3 factorial design was used having two independent variables each with three levels .The first independent variable was serial learning with its three manipulated levels i.e, temporal, absolute and Relative coding of positions.
A simple serial learning task with rats may involve the repetition of series in which each trial concludes with a reward value that is unique to a given location in the series.
A good example of a serial learning problem that does not seem to be explicable unless reference is made to reward-memory associations can be found in an experiment reported by Capaldi et al.
Neuropsychologic testing of schizophrenics has shown that executive function, verbal fluency, motor speed, vigilance, and serial learning are typically severely impaired; working memory, visuomotor skills, delayed recall, and immediate memory span are moderately impaired; and distractibility is moderately increased.
ApAv (Approach-Avoidance Coping); AgenAnal (Agentic: Analytic Learning);AgenSer (Agentic: Serial Learning); ConvAtt (Conventional Attitudes TowardLearning); DeepSem (Deep:Semantic Learning): DeepTh (Deep:ThinkingLearning); ElabEpis (Elaborative: Episodic Learning); ElabSA (Elaborative: Self-Actualization Learning); LitMem (Literal Memorization Learning); MethSt (Methodical Study Learning); MoAcad (Learning Motivation: Academic Interest); MoEff (Learning Motivation: Effort); MoPers (Learning Motivation: Personal Responsibility); SECrit (Learning Self Efficacy: Critical Thinking); SEFact (Learning Self Efficacy:Retention of Facts); SEOrg (Learning Self Efficacy: Organizational Skills); SelfAsser (Self Assertion in Learning); SelfEstr (Self Esteem).
These individual differences in skewness had high test-retest reliability across different serial learning tasks.
Reviewing the literature, Crowder and Greene (2000) concluded that serial learning, and the understanding of psychological processes associated with it, has been of central importance in the general study of learning and cognition ever since Ebbinghaus.
A nonverbal organism's knowledge of ordinal position in a serial learning task.
Just as in the development of theoretical models for human serial learning, realization of the importance for animals of information about the ordinal position of items in a list followed an initial theoretical emphasis on the role of the memories of list items.
Rats' serial-pattern learning capacities have been studied extensively, and the parallels with human serial learning abilities are ubiquitous.
The study of numerical competence in animals has been examined, most notably by Capaldi and Miller (1988a), using simple modifications of procedures already widely used to study serial learning in rats.
A test for order relevance in a three-element serial learning task.