series reliability

series reliability

[′sir·ēz ri‚lī·ə′bil·əd·ē]
(systems engineering)
Property of a system composed of elements in such a way that failure of any one element causes a failure of the system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some probabilistic methods include Haldar and Tang (1979) and the Taylor's Series reliability method, Wolf (1994); USACE (1997, 1998); Duncan (2000).
In order to determine the conditional probability of liquefaction, the Taylor's Series reliability method and Monte Carlo simulation method are used.
In the Taylor's Series reliability method, Wolff (1994); USACE (1997, 1998); Duncan (2000), conditional probability of liquefaction [P.sub.L] is determined, assuming a log-normal distribution of the factor of safety.
The conditional probability of liquefaction has been determined according to the probabilistic methods, Monte Carlo simulation method and the Taylor's Series Reliability Method, Wolff (1994); USACE (1997, 1998); Duncan (2000).
The Generic series reliability is 0.5 percent/1,000 hrs., e.g.
When these coefficients are compared to the Cochran coefficients of series reliability for the Hellriegel-Short index, the alpha coefficients for the MV indices are larger.
With respect to series reliability, the reliability of the MV indices appears to decrease.
Although this study shows that the MV index has an adequate degree of measurement and series reliability, additional empirical validation is needed.