serpentine


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serpentine

(sûr`pəntēn, –tīn), hydrous silicate of magnesium. It occurs in crystalline form only as a pseudomorph having the form of some other mineral and is generally found in the form of chrysotile (silky fibers) and antigorite and lizardite (which are both tabular). Chrysotile is also known as commercial asbestosasbestos,
common name for any of a variety of silicate minerals within the amphibole and serpentine groups that are fibrous in structure and more or less resistant to acid and fire.
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 which has been used for fireproofing and insulating material. It is commonly some shade of green, but may also be reddish, yellowish, black, or nearly white. It has a greasy or silky luster and is often translucent, even in large masses. Serpentine can be found in igneous rock, but it is more often a secondary mineral, usually resulting from the alteration of minerals or rocks containing magnesium, and it occurs very widely throughout the world, mainly as a product of metamorphism in rocks rich in olivine, pyroxene and amphibole. Serpentine rocks and basalts in the central zone of the Appalachian Mts of the eastern United States represent sutures of old oceanic crust, known as ophiolites, crushed between colliding continents. Essentially all lower crust and upper mantle rocks recovered from the mid-ocean ridges have been serpentinized to some degree by reaction with seawater. Serpentine rocks are classified as common serpentine and precious serpentine, the common serpentine being darker, less translucent, and sometimes impure. Serpentine is sometimes used as a gem and the massive varieties are quarried. Used like marble for decorative purposes, when serpentine is mixed with calcite, dolomite, or magnesite, a mottled or veined rock called verd antique is produced, although the masses are frequently jointed and only small slabs can be secured. Serpentine takes a beautiful high polish, but it is easily cracked and discolored by exposure to the weather and is consequently of little value for exterior use. Serpentine deposits are found in Canada, S Africa, and Vermont and Arizona in the United States.

Serpentine

1. A form that resembles a serpent, showing a sinuous winding movement; a greenish brown or spotted mineral used as a decorative stone in architectural work.
2. A group of minerals consisting of hydrous magnesium silicate or rock largely composed of these minerals; commonly occurs in greenish shades; used as decorative stone. See also: Stone

Serpentine

 

a mineral of the phyllosilicate subclass. Its chemical composition is Mg6[Si4O10](OH)8. Three varieties of serpentine are distinguished according to morphology and the nature of the deformation of the crystal lattice: antigorite, chry-sotile, and lizardite. Antigorite has a lapidoblastic texture, chry-sotile is composed of fine fibers, and lizardite has a fine-grained texture. All varieties crystallize in the monoclinic system. The various structures of serpentine are related to different deformations of the crystal lattice. These structural types are distinguished by X-ray diffraction and methods involving the electron microscope. Mg can be replaced by Fe or Ni.

Serpentine may be white, yellowish, green, or dark green-brown, depending on the content of and ratio between Fe3+ and Fe2+, as well as on Ni admixtures. The hardness of serpentine on Mohs’ scale varies from 2.5 to 3, and the density is 2,550 kg/m3. Serpentine is the rock-forming mineral of serpentinites. Serpophite (compact serpentine), an opal-like material with a waxlike luster, is used as an industrial stone.

serpentine

[′sər·pən‚tēn]
(mineralogy)
(Mg,Fe)3Si2O5(OH)4 A group of green, greenish-yellow, or greenish-gray ferromagnesian hydrous silicate rock-forming minerals having greasy or silky luster and a slightly soapy feel; translucent varieties are used for gemstones as substitutes for jade.

serpentine

A group of minerals consisting of hydrous magnesium silicate, or rock largely composed of these minerals; commonly occurs in greenish shades; used for decorative stone; the prominent constituent in some commercial marbles.

serpentine

guards against bites of venomous creatures. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 108]

serpentine

1
1. of, relating to, or resembling a serpent
2. Maths a curve that is symmetric about the origin of and asymptotic to the x-axis

serpentine

2
1. a dark green or brown mineral with a greasy or silky lustre, found in igneous and metamorphic rocks. It is used as an ornamental stone; and one variety (chrysotile) is known as asbestos. Composition: hydrated magnesium silicate. Formula: Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 Crystal structure: monoclinic
2. any of a group of minerals having the general formula (Mg,Fe)3Si2O5(OH)4
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