Sesterce


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Sesterce

 

(also sestertius), a coin circulated in ancient Rome. Beginning in 269 B.C., the sesterce was minted from silver; from the late first century B.C.. it was minted from an alloy of base metals. Initially worth 2½ asses, in 217 B.C.. it became equal to 4 asses. The sesterce was the basic Roman medium of exchange and unit of value.

References in periodicals archive ?
71 6 89 12 98 6 101 7 sans visuel 18 6 monnaie percee 26 3 monnaie reduite en semis ; contremarque illisible (avers) 42 5 (1) A = as; D = DENIER; DP = DUPONDIUS; Q = QUINAIRE; QD = QUADRANS; S = SESTERCE. FIG.
Grace a des inscriptions d'Italie, il a pu etre calcule que la restauration d'un mille de voie romaine coutait entre 66 000 et 110 000 sesterces environ et suppose que l'ouverture d'une route nouvelle pouvait atteindre un demi-million de sesterces par mille.
He played dice with four hundred thousand sesterces the point.
Caesar reports that Scaeva's valiant service saved the fort; the grateful general rewarded his faithful soldier with 200,000 sesterces and promoted him from eighth rank to first centurionate (Civil War 3.53).
THE HIGHEST PAID SPORTSMAN OF ALL TIME THE illiterate Romano-Hispanic Gaius Appuleius Diocles won 1,462 chariot races and is said to have retired at the age of 42 with winnings totalling 35,863,120 Roman sesterces - enough money to buy grain for the entire city of Rome for a year.
The Spanish ace pocketed 35,863,120 sesterces - around [euro]12billion in modern money - by the age of 42.
Octavien, emerveille, acheta vingt mille sesterces l'oiseau complimenteur.
Four hundred sesterces Gracchus gives as dowry to a horn-player (or perhaps he played a 'straight instrument').
As Pliny wrote in the first century: "Not a year passed in which India did not take 50 million sesterces away from Rome." That trade imbalance implied a continuous drain on gold and silver coin, causing shortages of these metals in Rome.
For the most irresponsible act of treasure-eating bravado we must look not to India, but to Egypt and the night when Cleopatra took a pearl worth ten million sesterces (about $C 35 million today) and dropped it into a bowl of wine vinegar.
We do not have any information concerning the blocking of streets or the hindering of traffic in Pompeii outside legal rights, but in the southern Spanish city of Urso, there was a fine of 1000 sesterces for doing so.
Livia had written a legacy of 50 000 000 sesterces to Galba in the form