sexual

(redirected from sexual desire disorders)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.
Related to sexual desire disorders: HSDD

sexual

(of reproduction) characterized by the union of male and female gametes
References in periodicals archive ?
Sexual desire and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI): a sexual desire cutpoint for clinical interpretation of the FSFI in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder. J Sex Med.
If Lonely Laurn is upset about hir low sexual desire, ze meets the diagnostic criteria for lifelong HSDD or the gendered DSM-5 equivalent of Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder (FSI/AD) or Male Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (MHSDD)--even if ze does not experience sexual attraction.
A score of 5 or lower on the desire domain suggests the presence of Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD; Gerstenberger et al., 2010).
The prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in Colombian females and associated factors
After discussion of the nature and causes of these problems, and issues and debates, a group of psychologists, psychiatrists, and sexual medicine specialists from the US and Canada address treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder using a variety of therapies, such as cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based therapy, crucible therapy, and pharmacology, as well as the role of androgens, assessment, comorbid individual and relationship dysfunction, sexual desire after breast cancer, and other topics.
Hypoactive sexual desire disorder in postmenopausal women: US results from the Women's International Study of Health and Sexuality (WISHeS).
For women who are candidates for testosterone therapy, there are a few products containing testosterone that are available by prescription for off-label use in treating sexual desire disorders in postmenopausal women, according to NAMS.
The implications of the study findings are discussed in relation to the definition, classification, and treatment of sexual desire disorders in women.
A few testosterone-containing products are FDA-approved for use in women, but would be used off-label to treat sexual desire disorders. Compounded preparations of testosterone are also available by prescription, but they are not subject to the same quality control as FDA-approved products and may result in inconsistent dosing.
"It's the sexual desire disorders that are the stickiest issue for physicians to get to the bottom of.
None of these products are indicated for the treatment of sexual desire disorders.