sexuality


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sexuality

[‚sek·shə′wal·əd·ē]
(biology)
The sum of a person's sexual attributes, behavior, and tendencies.
The psychological and physiological sexual impulses whose satisfaction affords pleasure.
(psychology)
The quality of being sexual, or the degree of a person's sexual attributes, attractiveness, and drives.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sexuality

  1. (common usage) a natural or essential property of the individual which finds expression through sexual activities and relationships.
  2. an object of physiological, psychological and sociological investigation first established in the 19th-century by sexologists such as Havelock Ellis and Krafft-Ebing and the psychoanalyst FREUD, and continued by many others, e.g. Kinsey et al. (1948).
  3. an area of social and cultural behaviour subject to state regulation and control, particularly in the context of prostitution and HOMOSEXUALITY.
  4. (general sociological usage) personal and interpersonal expression of those socially constructed qualities, desires, roles and identities which have to do with sexual behaviour and activity
  5. a social process involving both institutional and experiential dimensions of sexual relationships.
  6. a normative set of expectations concerning sexual practices.
  7. preference for, or an orientation towards, specific forms of sexual expression and desire.
Sociological usages of the term frequently stress the social and cultural relativity of norms surrounding sexual behaviour and the sociohistorical construction of sexual identities and roles. In doing so, it contrasts with common usage which regards sexuality as a property largely intrinsic to the individual or as something which is determined by the early psychosexual experiences of the child (see FREUD). Writers such as FOUCAULT (1979) and Weeks (1985) have challenged naturalistic and essentialist arguments, referring to the way in which cultural definitions of sexuality and the control of the BODY are exercised ‘among other ways’ by the medium of systematic knowledge. Desire and the objects of desire are seen as being shaped by social forces (see also EROTICISM). Sexuality and its social constructions have featured in debates within feminist and gay politics, where androcentric and heterosexist definitions of sexuality are seen to be inimical to the interests of women and gays.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

Sexuality

Flowers of Evil, The
thoroughly explore the possibilities of vice, depravity, and sin. [Fr. Poetry: Baudelaire The Flowers of Evil in Magill III, 399]
Hite Report
surveys men’s sexual habits and performance. [Amer. Pop. Cult.: Misc.]
Ideal Marriage
Van de Velde study of the physiology and technique of marital sex. [Pop. Cult.: Misc.]
Joy of Sex, The
popular 20th-century sex manual. [Misc.: Dr. Alex Comfort The Joy of Sex in Weiss, 239]
Kinsey reports
pioneer explorations of sexual behavior based on interviews with 100,000 men and women. [Pop. Cult.: Misc.]
Masters and Johnson
published a study of sexual performance under laboratory conditions. [Sexology: Masters and Johnson Human Sexual Response in Weiss, 214]
Morel, Paul
his Oedipus complex makes erotic fulfillment impossible. [Br. Lit.: D. H. Lawrence Sons and Lovers in Magill I, 913]
Psychology of Sex, The
seven-volume Ellis work revolutionized attitudes toward sex and sexual problems. [Pop. Cult.: Misc.]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sexuality education not only protects learners from HIV and sexually transmitted infections but also equips them with necessary skills to address justice and equity to prevent physical, emotional, verbal or sexual violence.
The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) published a review of 87 studies on sexuality education from around the world in 2009.
The book begins by acknowledging the changes that have recently swept through the Western Christian Church in the arena of sexuality. Wilson points out that change in moral intuition and a shifting of views on Biblical authority have contributed to these changing perspectives, perhaps most clearly, in Christian thinking about homosexuality.
Sexuality is a social construct influenced and sculpted by individuals and systems within one's environment (e.g., at home, at school, in one's community, in one's city) (WHO, 2006).
The focus of the class, while primarily sociological, covers a wide area of ground in terms of what sexuality is and isn't.
The purpose of this study is to draw the attention of women librarians to some roles expected of them towards promoting sexuality education in the context of Nigerian environment.
* trained more than 120 educators and advocates from 24 states and DC through the convening of the Ninth Annual State Sex Ed Summit in June 2015 organized with key national colleague organizations from the reproductive justice, sexuality education, HIV/AIDS, and LGBTQ rights communities.
The mission of the show is to not only educate people about aspects of sexuality that most do not understand and give them the resources they need to get in touch with their own sexuality and have a healthy active sex life, but also to inspire them to think more freely about their sexuality so that they can become more sexually liberated and comfortable in their own sexuality so that they can experience it in a more fulfilling way.
Loader launches his address to this universally interesting, indeed intriguing, topic with the assumptions that we are all sexual beings and that understanding how the people of the Bible thought of sexuality will influence both how we view it and how we respond to each other sexually.
In the early fifties, Clelland Ford and Frank Beach (1951) identified some barriers that researchers must overcome when they put their lens on sexuality. These barriers were summarized in the complexity of observing sexual conduct in societies in which sexuality was considered an intimate and private issue.
The book posited a fundamental shift in sexual regimes, from an early American moment when sexuality was seen primarily as procreative to a twentieth-century "sexualized society" that tied sexuality to pleasure, happiness, and individual self-fulfillment.
Although many researchers have studied the impact of sexuality education on students, not much is known about the values of the teachers related to how they deliver sexuality education content to their students.