sgraffito

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sgraffito:

see graffitograffito
. 1 Method of ornamenting architectural plaster surfaces. The designs are produced by scratching a topcoat of plaster to reveal an undercoat of contrasting and deeper color.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Sgraffito

Decoration produced by covering a surface, such as plaster or enamel, of one color with a thin coat of a similar material of another color and scratching through the outer coat to show the color beneath.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sgraffito

 

a type of decorative mural painting produced by scratching the fine surface layer of plaster until the underlying plaster, which is a different color than the upper, is revealed. In ancient times the sgraffito effect was used in archaic Greek and Etruscan vases. From the 15th to 17th centuries sgraffito was popular in Italian wall decoration. It was mostly used to embellish facades, owing to the durability of the technique. Sgraffiti subsequently spread from Italy to other countries, including Germany and Bohemia. Sgraffito is widely used in 20th-century mural painting.

REFERENCE

Krestov, M. A. Shtukalurka sgraffito. Moscow, 1938.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sgraffito

A type of decoration executed by covering a surface, as of plaster or enamel, of one color, with a thin coat of a similar material of another color, and then scratching or scoring through the outer coat to show the color beneath.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sgraffiti method involves two or three coats of whitewash being overlaid onto naturally coloured plaster.
Door archways, window recesses, gables and corners are the main areas decorated in this way, although sometimes, whole sections of a building's facade can be covered in sgraffiti.
Today, newly built holiday flats in the Engadine are sometimes decorated with sgraffiti, but experts turn up their noses at most of the recent creations.
Producing sgraffiti decor turns out to be less time-consuming than most laymen imagine.
Civic and church buildings scattered throughout southern and eastern Switzerland help keep sgraffiti plasterers busy with renovation projects.
Emmenegger, who works with his sons to restore many historic buildings nationwide from offices in Zizers, calls the Engadine's sgraffiti tradition "a bit archaic." He also finds fault with the lower standards applied there.