shackle


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shackle

a U-shaped bracket, the open end of which is closed by a bolt (shackle pin), used for securing ropes, chains, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

shackle

[′shak·əl]
(design engineering)
An open or closed link of various shapes with extended legs; each leg has a transverse hole to accommodate a pin, bolt, or the like, which may or may not be furnished.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

clevis

An iron (or a link in a chain) bent into the form of a horseshoe, stirrup, or letter U, with holes in the ends to receive a bolt or pin. (See illustration p. 218.)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results on plasma lactate, however, showed a significant effect of restraint method (p<0.001) as plasma lactate in the shackle restraint group was higher compared to the cone restraint group.
Christopher Shackle's translation of Shah Abdul Latif Bhitai's Risalo loses out on nuance, but is consistent, articulate and fairly accurate
(34.) Adam Liptak, Prisons Often Shackle Pregnant Inmates in Labor,
"Grey is the most exciting network in the world at the moment," says Shackle without any hint of a doubt.
After the brief introductory chapter, Littleboy deals with Shackle's' 'life and vision' in Chapter 2 (there is much more on the vision than on the life, which seems to have been remarkably uneventful); Earl adds a genealogical Appendix on the Shackle family tree.
The Door Shackle helps to prevent the overall unpleasantness and loss of property that results from a room or home being broken into.
The inquest has heard that instructions given to those fitting the seats was to tighten the shackle nut and bolt with one or one-anda-half threads showing.
The committee was told the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists all oppose the use of shackles or restraints on incarcerated women in labor because it impedes the ability of physicians to assess, evaluate, and provide appropriate care to the mother and child.
Remove the four pins and shackles from the front of the disabled vehicle and the rear of the towing vehicle.
The IHS features robust metal die-cast housing, plated steel hook and sturdy, oversized shackle. A spare rechargeable battery is included, allowing one to be used while the other is recharging.
The assemblies, which consist of shackle body, bolt, nut, and cotter, comply with DNV rules for lifting appliances and are designed for use with chain, wire rope, and synthetic slings.
Adidas faced a furious backlash over its shackle shoes, or the JS Roundhouse Mids, from those who accused the brand of racism.