shade

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Related to shadiness: whimsically, shadowiness

shade

1. a darker area indicated in a painting, drawing, etc., by shading
2. a colour that varies slightly from a standard colour due to a difference in hue, saturation, or luminosity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

shade

[shād]
(optics)
The color of a mixture of pigments or dyes which has some black pigment or dye in it.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shade

1. A material hung from, and coiled on, a ratcheted spring-activated roller; used to provide privacy, to darken a room, or to reduce the amount of sunlight striking a window.
2. The result of the addition of a black dispersion to a mixture of white and color.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
There was much shadiness in his management of those accounts.
But the monstrous growth of betting on ALL sports means the need for strict regulation and monitoring of an industry that has gloried in its shadiness has never been greater.
"Legal" referred not to the relative shadiness of the operations, but to the savings stamps issued with each purchase.
Lawlessness, permissiveness, crime, Ryn points out, are everywhere prominent: "Old-fashioned honesty and integrity yield to shadiness and opportunism." "Behaviors are accepted or held up for emulation that once were considered abhorrent." No two sentences better capture the tenor and temper of Ryn's book, which, to reiterate, appeared over ten years ago; or more fully confirm and reinforce its diagnostic insights into the condition of American civilization entering a new millennium, as the New World Order takes on more concrete shape, and as an empowered majoritarian, plebiscitary democracy fearlessly re-defines and re-fashions moral and cultural concepts.
This shadiness of accounting eventuates in a narration that, for all its observational ideals, confuses the roles of reporter, columnist, and editor.
Even as the Enron scandal broke open on January 10, Limbaugh admonished listeners that the true shadiness lay in the way Linda Daschle's clients, American and Northwest Airlines, had benefited from the post-September 11 airline bailout.
The squalor and shadiness of his other responses--alluding to Ms.
The bookie's status or wealth (or even known shadiness!) has no more clout than our own poverty or predicament.