shaft lining

shaft lining

[′shaft ‚līn·iŋ]
(mining engineering)
The timber, steel, brick, or concrete structure fixed around a shaft to support the walls.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the shaft is subjected to the coupling of underground water pressure and other loads during the entire service period, partial function of shaft lining structure will be lost, or a water inrush accident may even occur.
For those deep mines, the protected structures called the shaft lining for transporting labors and minerals become a kind of necessary infrastructure.
Wet-mix shotcrete has been specified for the final shaft lining, and the local subsidiary of Swiss-based specialist supplier, MBT, won a R1.5 million contract to provide materials and admixtures for the shotcrete.
The stability of a shaft, especially within the superficial soil layer near the ground surface, relies heavily on the shaft lining. During the operational life of a mine, shaft stability is essential in order to ensure economic viability of mining operations and to safeguard against injury and loss of life.
Instead of the costly excavation of slots, only used for a temporary station, shaft water rings are used to collect both the water which seeps through the shaft lining and water coming from the in-shaft pumps.
The shuttering mainly in use is a self-stripping shaft lining shutter designed by a Donetsk shaft-sinking firm.