shagbark hickory


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shagbark hickory

[‚shag‚bärk ′hik·ə·rē]
(forestry)
Carya ovata. A type of hickory that grows to a height of about 120 ft (36 m) and is found in the eastern half of the United States and adjacent Canada. It is the most important species because of the commercial value of its nuts and of its wood.
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They eventually settled on another shagbark hickory tree near Sodalis Woods (Sparks 2003) and a series of bat-boxes along the East Fork of White Lick Creek (Ritzi et al.
Two species of hickory, Carya ovata (shagbark hickory), and C.
Hickory, red hickory, white hickory, brown hickory, black hickory, pignut hickory, mockernut hickory, shellbark hickory, scalyback hickory, big shellbark hickory; bottom hickory, western hickory, thick shellbark hickory, shagbark hickory, broom hickory
The response of shagbark hickory to defoliation in 1997 was similar to that of red oak although not as strong (Table 2).
Pin oak was the most commonly used species (33%), followed by silver maple (25%), American elm (23%) and shagbark hickory (Carya ovata; 11%).
COUNTRYSIDE: I just received the Sept/ Oct 2009 issue of COUNTRYSIDE and was reading about the shagbark hickory nuts.
Bertin holds a compound leaf from a shagbark hickory tree at Cookson Park in Worcester.
Most of the specimens were constructed of kiln-dried yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) because of its ready availability in all needed sizes and the ease with which the larger dowels could be machined with available equipment; however, limited numbers of specimens were constructed of white ash (Fraxinus americana), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), southern yellow pine (Pinus sp.), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and red oak (Quercus rubra).
The towering shagbark hickory trees and huge white oaks made this a squirrel Mecca.
The prominent "true" hickories include shagbark hickory, shellbark hickory, pignut hickory and mockernut hickory.
(Recently in Missouri there was a black walnut frenzy, as the nuts' price rose over 25% in one year.) Yet there is little public interest in another member of the juglandaceous family, the shagbark hickory.
rupture), shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), elm (Ulmus spp.), serviceberry (Amelanchier arborea), beech (Fagus grandifolia), musclewood (Carpinus caroliniana), buckeye (Aesculus glabra), smooth sumac (Rhus glabra), black haw (Viburnum prunifolium) and hawthorn (Crataegus spp.), and were neutral (showing no significant preference for or against) towards dogwood (Comus spp.), ash (Fraxinus spp.), witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana), bitternut hickory (Carya cordiformis) and cherry (Prunus spp.; Fig.