shallow well

shallow well

[′shal·ō ′wel]
(hydrology)
A water well, generally dug up by hand or by excavating machinery, or put down by driving or boring, that taps the shallowest aquifer in the vicinity.
A well whose water level is shallow enough to permit use of a suction pump, the practical lift of which is taken as 22 feet (6.7 meters).
References in classic literature ?
The shallow wells that caught the surface seepage of the rain were filled with salt.
In a radio interview, she said a shallow well costs P25,000.
Due to the depth and structure of the shallow well, contamination with organic and inorganic compounds is a major concern [2]; contaminationwith chemical elements such as Pb, Cd, Cr, F, As, Cu and Mn can occur in such waters, with consequent health hazards to consumers.
By-products of human activity in nonindustrial suburban and rural areas that have been found to impact shallow well aquifers include
Folks who have deeper wells and adequate yields stand a better chance of going through a drought without having a problem than somebody who has a shallow well or a low-yield well.
This existing Vernon shallow well field provides stable, low decline, long life production with low operating costs and the potential for the drilling of over 150 additional wells with a very low risk of dry holes, stated the company.
Roxi is pleased to update the market with news of Deep Well A6 and Shallow well 142.
Seeking to replicate the success of Well 143 Roxi is pleased to announce that Shallow Well 141 has been spudded.
The area has a high water table, and nearby residents are still using shallow wells, they said, disputing statements by Heartland that wells in the area were deep and would not be affected if pollutants escaped the landfill.