Shame


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Shame

 

the feeling experienced by a person when he has committed an immoral act or one demeaning to human dignity. The kinds of action that evoke a feeling of shame are determined by social and historical conditions and by evolving ethical norms. Shame is experienced as painful anxiety, dissatisfaction with one’s self, censure of one’s own behavior, and regret over one’s action. A person may feel ashamed over unworthy behavior on the part of others, especially of persons one is close to. Shame is also experienced when one recalls a humiliating act committed in the past. The feeling of shame may be accompanied by discernible somatic symptoms, such as blushing or a lowering of the eyes.

References in periodicals archive ?
The paper courageously invites readers into a debate about an issue, which although disturbingly common, is one that inspires a true shame response, that is, to avoid, conceal and flee.
When individuals feel the threat of shame this can lead to failure to seek treatment.
Rather than seeing shame as an unfortunate byproduct of living in poverty, human development planners should consider how poverty undermines human dignity.
Penzel, 2003) and the paucity of research investigating these relationships, the current study was designed to assess the relationships among multidimensional perfectionism, shame, and TTM symptom severity in a clinical and nonclinical sample.
Conroy and Elliot (2004), for example, reported that athletes who feared shame and embarrassment were more likely to have avoidance goals (i.
The only people who don't experience shame have no capacity for human empathy or connection," Brown said in her popular TED Talk on vulnerability.
Elison, Lennon, and Pulos (2006) developed and validated the Compass of Shame Scale (CoSS), which they claimed as the first self-report measure specifically designed to assess how individuals regulate their shame once it is experienced.
The relationship between traumatic experiences and feelings of shame has been documented in the literature.
The problem with shame is that it often proves to be too crude an instrument, too brutal and indiscriminate for the task at hand.
1) Wielding shame against an excessive "degree of softness, that soon became ridiculous," the article echoes the moves of even novelists like Ann Radcliffe, who, though she might seem to have an irrepressible flair for emotional indulgence, also pits shame against sensibility.
SHAME HIDES THE BEST OF OUR BEING AND ALL WE HAVE TO OFFER.