Shame

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Shame

 

the feeling experienced by a person when he has committed an immoral act or one demeaning to human dignity. The kinds of action that evoke a feeling of shame are determined by social and historical conditions and by evolving ethical norms. Shame is experienced as painful anxiety, dissatisfaction with one’s self, censure of one’s own behavior, and regret over one’s action. A person may feel ashamed over unworthy behavior on the part of others, especially of persons one is close to. Shame is also experienced when one recalls a humiliating act committed in the past. The feeling of shame may be accompanied by discernible somatic symptoms, such as blushing or a lowering of the eyes.

References in periodicals archive ?
Shame is conceptualized as a negative, self-conscious family of emotions that results from feelings of devaluation (Elison, 2005; Nathanson, 1992; Tomkins, 1963).
Bewes, on the other hand, does not so much take issue with the theoretical predilections of postcolonial studies as work through them to inaugurate a heuristic that reorients the structure of postcolonial studies by reading literary texts as so many "event[s] of postcolonial shame.
Quiet As It's Kept: Shame, Trauma, and Race in the Novels of Toni Morrison.
The focus list shames underperforming firms, but rarely targets managers individually.
1) Many of us are also dimly aware that such shame sanctions continue to be used in much of the nonwestern world.
Her contribution is to suggest the analytic framework of family-based shame for understanding the James family's interactions, and carefully to narrativize the persistent effects of family shame on Henry's career, the central focus of her study.
Still, despite the novel's familiar-seeming plot, the character of Murray Zemelman gives Shames a new lease on his fiction.