Shame

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shame

 

the feeling experienced by a person when he has committed an immoral act or one demeaning to human dignity. The kinds of action that evoke a feeling of shame are determined by social and historical conditions and by evolving ethical norms. Shame is experienced as painful anxiety, dissatisfaction with one’s self, censure of one’s own behavior, and regret over one’s action. A person may feel ashamed over unworthy behavior on the part of others, especially of persons one is close to. Shame is also experienced when one recalls a humiliating act committed in the past. The feeling of shame may be accompanied by discernible somatic symptoms, such as blushing or a lowering of the eyes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
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(2009) found that the presence of others elevated levels of vicarious parental shame stemming from a child's behavior.
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The Event of Postcolonial Shame is a dense dissertation on the nature, morphology and modality of shame in its correlation with writing within the modern temporality of post/colonialism.
According to Bewes, literary discussions of shame have tended to feature predominantly in the context of auto/biographical schemas: "insofar as we detect the presence of shame in a literary text, we attribute an autobiographical quality to it" (2).
On the other hand, shame is a more totalizing experience and carries with it a more powerful message: You are inadequate, not the equal of others, without the same dignity (Nussbaum, 2004).
Whereas shame emphasizes one's incapacity, another related emotion, guilt, highlights one's responsibility.