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sharp

1. Music
a. denoting a note that has been raised in pitch by one chromatic semitone
b. (of an instrument, voice, etc.) out of tune by being or tending to be too high in pitch
2. Music
a. an accidental that raises the pitch of the following note by one chromatic semitone.
b. a note affected by this accidental
3. any medical instrument with sharp point or edge, esp a hypodermic needle

Sharp

Cecil (James). 1859--1924, British musician, best known for collecting, editing, and publishing English folk songs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sharp

(character)
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References in classic literature ?
Men began to throng into the office and call at him over the railing, jovially, sharply, viciously, excitedly.
Glegg, and at Maggie; then suddenly appearing aware that some one was seated by his side at the head of the bed he turned sharply round and saw his sister.
Still regarding him sharply but not unsympathetically the man of science bluntly inquired:
Professor Hylop, who was known to Professor Bumper, stepped forward and asked sharply:
On a colossal pedestal, the cliff, - motionless at the extreme edge of the capping rock and sharply outlined against the sky, - was an equestrian statue of impressive dignity.
"PollyANNA!" ejaculated her aunt, turning sharply about as she reached the head of the stairs.
The locomotive-boiler stood on end, and it and the whole locomotive-boiler stood on end, and it and the whole locomotive were tiled sharply backward.
The Bishop no sooner saw this action than he knew his man, and that there was a trap set; and being an arrant coward, he wheeled his horse sharply and would have made off down the road; but his own men, spurred on the charge, blocked his way.
The chattering crowd, with their rude jokes cried out from wagon to wagon, sometimes irritated him sharply. He regretted that he also could not laugh boisterously, shout meaningless jokes and make of himself a figure in the endless stream of moving, giggling activity that went up and down the road.
"It's not a sovereign you'll be taking from the gentleman for a little errand like that," she insisted sharply. "He shall pay us for what he's had when he goes, and welcome, and if so be that he's willing to make it a sovereign, to include the milk and the brandy and the confusion we've been put to this night, well and good.
"Oh, indeed?" she rejoined, sharply. "Considering that we are all here for the purpose of playing, that seems rather remarkable.
Therefore if a man look sharply and attentively, he shall see Fortune: for though she be blind, yet she is not invisible.