shatter zone

shatter zone

[′shad·ər ‚zōn]
(geology)
An area of randomly fissured or cracked rock that may be filled by mineral deposits, forming a network pattern of veins.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Yet the ultimate shatter zone, I would argue, is a place where human civilisation itself collapses, whether through warfare, so-called natural disaster--such as rising sea levels induced by climate change--or some other fundamental disruption in the biological life support systems required to sustain human existence.
What La Salle witnessed was the effects of what anthropologist Robbie Ethridge christened the "Mississippian Shatter Zone" in her previous book.
Scott holds that the whole of the massif, stretching from northeastern India through southern China and much of mainland Southeast Asia, should be seen as one large "shatter zone"--a place to which one after another breakaway component of state-dominated society (but perhaps also many lone refugees) repaired in defense.
"Much of the Southeast Asian massif is, in effect, a shatter zone," he writes.
Pakistan sets in a shatter zone where International power play takes place on almost daily basis and remains under diplomatic and economic pressure due to extra regional powers as well as regional players.
21st century is a century of global connectivity, no wonder some of the leading powers of Eurasia like China and Russia are actively working to connect the globe through a system of land and maritime routes, on the other hand, the old globalists led by the West, who thrived on creation of blocks, division of regions and creation of shatter zones and barrier belts, are trying hard to create a fear of the rise of new powers so as to maintain the status quo.
All occurred in what Mark Levene felicitously calls the "rimlands," the ethnically heterogeneous and geopolitically vulnerable shatter zones where new nation-states and the USSR emerged from the old Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian, and Russian imperial regimes.
Shatter zones make more sense empirically than complex frontiers; given that Rieber sees delineating frontiers as automatically complicating all relationships between peoples directly affected by them, "complex" seems oxymoronic.
Intellectual and political themes are carefully linked, as in Peter Bugge's essay, "'Shatter Zones": The Creation and Re-creation of Europe's East'.
(The conflict already brewing at Paddington, over proposals for tower blocks, gives the flavour.) True, Llewelyn-Davies's work on sustainable residential quality did show room for up to 100,000 new units in what it called the shatter zones -- underdeveloped sites such as car parks around the commercial cores -- around London's suburban stations; but the report is looking for many more homes than that.