shear joint


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shear joint

[′shir ‚jȯint]
(geology)
A joint that is a shear fracture; it is a potential plane of shear. Also known as slip joint.

lap joint

lap joint, 2
1. A joint in which one board, plank, metal plate, etc., overlaps the edge of another piece; the overlapping part of each member is cut away to half thickness, resulting in flush surfaces.
2. A joint formed by placing one piece partly over another and uniting the overlapped portions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, irrespective of fatigue life, stack configuration and rivet head height, all the SPR lap shear joints tested at less than 80% of the monotonic failure load in the current study failed in the bottom sheet of AA6111, as shown in Figure 6.
(1) Planar: the macroscopic outline of shear joint caused by shear stress or incomplete joint formed by interdissected is commonly planar.
For shear joint caused by shear stress, when its wall is uniformly distributed, cryptomere or vitreous magmatic rock (such as basalt), fine-grained sedimentary rock (such as clay rock), or fine-grained metamorphic rock (such as slate) planar surface undulating shape may form.
Whether shear joint or tensile joint, whether homogeneous wall rock or heterogeneous wall rock, and whether fine-grained wall rock or coarse-grained wall rock, all can form undulating surface shape.
Shear joint caused by shear stress and incomplete joint formed by interdissected is commonly planar.
Results on PA6 (near field, shear joint 60 [degrees]) are shown in Fig.
15 Impedance measurements are shown for both shear joint configurations of PA6.
(In the case of a shear joint, choose an energy level at which the product has just fully closed.)
The findings are intended for engineers and NDE practitioners concerned with the design of new, as well as inspection and maintenance of existing, shear joints.
Brungraber and Morse-Fortier (7) conducted research on double and single shear joints with variations in direction of loading relative to the grain of the side members, growth ring orientation of the peg, and number of pegs in the joint.
Tests were performed on double shear joints, connected with a single 1-inch-diameter northern red oak peg, loaded in tension parallel to the grain of the main member.
High percentages of wood failure in the shear joints were further indications that the full parallel-to-grain strengths of both species were nearly reached (Figs.