shear spinning

shear spinning

[′shir ‚spin·iŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
A sheet-metal-forming process which forms parts with rotational symmetry over a mandrel with the use of a tool or roller in which deformation is carried out with a roller in such a manner that the diameter of the original blank does not change but the thickness of the part decreases by an amount dependent on the mandrel angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The similarities to shear spinning or shear forming are quite obvious.
There is a similar process called flow forming or shear spinning, and it's relatively new.
Shear spinning uses a free-turning roller pressing against a rotating workpiece.
Because it thins the stock, shear spinning produces a part with the same diameter as the blank, thus saving material.
BFL's Burton F Lewis believes that shear spinning should be more widely accepted.
In a typical cell, a press blanks out the round workpiece, followed by shear spinning, then perhaps another press operation to punch out holes.
Shear spinning creates a smooth, contoured shape in a single continuous motion that would be almost impossible in conventional presses without expensive multiple-operation tools.
Shear spinning or flow forming thins the metal in direct relation to the steepness of the forming.
In shear spinning, forming results from the highly concentrated pressure at the roller nose.