shed

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shed

1
1. a small building or lean-to of light construction, used for storage, shelter, etc.
2. a large roofed structure, esp one with open sides, used for storage, repairing locomotives, sheepshearing, etc.
3. a large retail outlet in the style of a warehouse

shed

2
1. (in weaving) the space made by shedding
2. short for watershed

shed

Physics a former unit of nuclear cross section equal to 10--52 square metre
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Shed

A rough structure for shelter, storage or a workshop; it may be a separate building or a lean-to against another structure, often with one or more open sides.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Shed

 

a structure for keeping furbearing animals. A shed consists of a lean-to with a gable roof, under which cages are arranged in two, four, or six rows. The supporting structure, or framework, is made of wood, steel, or reinforced concrete. The roof is tile or slate. The passages between the rows of cages are paved with asphalt. In regions with large snowdrifts the cages are set on posts, and there are closed corridors.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

shed

[shed]
(nuclear physics)
A unit of cross section, used in studying collisions of nuclei and particles, equal to 10-24 barn, or 10-48 square centimeter.

SHED

[shed]
(aerospace engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

shed

A rough structure for shelter, storage, or a workshop. It may be a separate building or a lean-to against another structure; often with one or more open sides.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
That moment, the shed was filled with armed men; and a body of horse, galloping into the field, drew up before it.
'Now then, if you're going,' said the serjeant, clapping Dennis on the back, and pointing after the officer who was walking towards the shed.
When Bert got to the refreshment shed, he found all the food had vanished except one measured ration of corned beef and three biscuits.
"'Owever, look 'ere--'ere!--the thing I started this talk about is where's that food there was in that shed? That's what I want to know.
Then he remembered he was hungry and went off, gun under his arm, to hunt in and about the refreshment shed. He had the sense to perceive that he must not show himself with the gun to the Prince and his companion.
Near the shed the kitten turned up again, obviously keen for milk.
He was disposed for a time to sit in the refreshment shed waiting for them, but then it occurred to him that so he might get them both at close quarters.
Then they went off briskly towards the refreshment shed, the Prince leading.
Bert fell back upon imprecations, then he went up to the shed, cursorily examined the possibility of a flank attack, put his gun handy, and set to work, with a convulsive listening pause before each mouthful on the Prince's plate of corned beef.
He went round the refreshment shed without finding any one, and then through the trees towards the flying-machine.
He made three strides across the devastated area, captured the kitten neatly, and went his way towards the shed, with her purring loudly on his shoulder.
For a time he fussed about the shed, and at last discovered the rest of the provisions hidden in the roof.