sheet composting


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sheet composting

[′shēt kəm‚pōst·iŋ]
(agriculture)
Addition of large amounts of organic residue to a soil; extra nitrogen is usually added for faster decomposition.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Sheet composting can help get rid of the lawn but it entails feeding a unusal 'monster' to bring about the desired result
The process called "sheet composting" is a well recognized method of adding organic matter to the ground.
One is sheet composting, or layer composting--some even call it lasagna gardening.
Current coordinator, Paul Winstanley, states that it is a small-scale permaculture site, demonstrating "sheet composting with fowl." Large amounts of organic materials deposited by neighbours, local gardening companies and the fowl themselves, are chicken-scratched by approximately 50 chickens, ducks and a turkey.
Put leftover vines, stalks, and leaves in a compost pile, or dig leafy remains directly into garden soil (this is called sheet composting).
Sheet composting. This easy method involves spreading organic materials over garden beds or paths where they can decompose in place--think heavy mulches.
We use green manure and sheet composting procedures to improve the soil for bean plantings.
One is "sheet composting." In classic composting, you build tall piles in bins, alternating layers of fresh, high-nitrogen "greens," such as grass clippings, with high-carbon, difficult to break down "browns," such as dry leaves.
Your method is often used on farms where large-scale composting might not be possible or practical, and is called sheet composting. It involves less work, especially if you use a manure spreader.
Try sheet composting now to help build up soil for spring planting.
This is called sheet composting. We use only a wheel-barrow and a pair of pitchforks, make a day of it, and generally have a good time.