sheet sandstone

sheet sandstone

[′shēt ′san‚stōn]
(geology)
A thin, blanket-shaped deposit of sandstone of regional extent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Main facies correspond to erosively-based, sheet sandstone bodies (Ssc; Fig.
Palaeocurrents data, mainly from tabular bedforms of relatively thick sets in both sheet sandstones and channels, present three main orientations (tridirectional pattern; E, W and SW; Fig.
Evidence of tidal process is recorded by the presence of a tridirectional paleocurrent pattern in the sheet and channel deposits (reflecting the complex networks of tidal channels and bars), and herringbone cross stratification, tidal bundles and mud drapes in the sheet sandstones; features usually considered as typical of tidal bars (Darlymple, 1992; Willis, 2005; Olariu et al., 2012).
Runkel, A.C., 2000, Sedimentology of the Upper Cambrian Jordan Sandstone--A classic cratonic sheet sandstone deposited during regression in a "typical" marine setting, Guidebook for 30th annual field conference, Great Lakes section for the Society for Sedimentary Geology, p.
and Winfree, K.E., 1986, Aeolian to Marine Transition in Cambro-Ordovician Cratonic Sheet Sandstones of the Northern Mississippi Valley, U.S.A., Sedimentology, v.
Miller, J.F., McKay, R.M., Palmer, A.R., and Taylor, J.F., 2007, High resolution sequence stratigraphy of lower Paleozoic sheet sandstones in central North America: The role of special conditions of cratonic interiors in development of stratal architecture: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v.
It occurs within a 7-m-thick succession of fine-grained sheet sandstone beds between 276-283 m in section of Davies and Gibling (2003).
Sheet sandstones become particularly abundant above 609 m.
Sheet sandstones represent crevasse-splay deposits formed when floodplain channels overtopped their banks and deposited a veneer of sand across the floodplain.
In Paleoproterozoic orogens of western Canada, sedimentary basins that are demonstrably post-orogenic, such as the cratonic sheet sandstones of the Athabasca, Thelon, and Hornby Bay basins (all approximately 1700 Ma), should provide a measure of remnant orogenic topography.
Small channel bodies are either isolated within mudrock or pass laterally into thin (<1 m thick) sheet sandstones. Channel fill consists of varying proportions of horizontal, low-angle, and ripple cross-laminated sandstone (Sh, Sl, and Sr respectively), or more rarely may largely contain laminated, grey/green mudstone.
Thin (<1 m thick) sheet sandstones are commonly interbedded with red mudrocks of the Little River Formation.